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  • ASPERGER HUSBAND: WHY IS HE SO ANGRY?

    BECAUSE ANGER WORKS!

    OK, yeah… LET’S DO THIS!

     

    FIRST AND FOREMOST

    Is your Aspie husband angry?  My common sense dictates that if you clicked on this post, the answer is yes.  My common sense also tells me that this would be a “Yes!” answer for the majority of neurotypical women married to a man with Asperger’s syndrome (diagnosed or not).  While not every husband with Aspergers is angry to the point that it dominates every other emotion, there are many who are.  For these men, anger was a learned response toward those around them as a means to protect themselves against emotions they were unable to express or unable to comprehend (due to their cognitive empathy deficit).  Angry husbands are angry because somewhere along the lines (as children) they decided it was the one emotion that managed to effectively get them relief from frustration.  Their frustration stemmed from misunderstood emotions of their own and those they were close to, and these misunderstandings caused them internal pain.  When anger was identified as a potential relief from their pain, it solidified itself as the dominant “go-to” response to any emotion-evoking communication in their adult years.

    How this looks for an Aspie child:  A child is feeling hurt that their friend is not playing with them.  The friend keeps giving nonverbal reasons why they won’t play that the Aspie is not understanding. The Aspie child is unable to effectively express their hurt feelings and is growing frustrated with the friend, who continues to give ambiguous reasons (not clear direct ones).  When this Aspie child begins to feel overwhelmed with their frustration, they want their friend to go away from them for a little bit or at least stop talking.  They try to say this out loud and get a response filled with more ambiguous rationales from their friend that do not make sense to them.  Finally, the Aspie child becomes angry and says, “Get away from me!” with a loud and hostile voice and… the friend goes away from them.  The use of anger just became an effective way to manage emotions that feel overwhelming.

    Another example:  An Aspie child is feeling unloved because their sister is constantly getting praise about her good grades and talent playing the guitar.  The Aspie is feeling rejected that his parents don’t seem to notice the good things he is doing, or talents he has (like building a near-replica of a car he loves out of clay).  Despite his hard work, talent, and accomplishments, he hears his parents scold him for his poor grades and tell him to “Stop playing with his model clay and focus on school more.”  After a while, the inability to express why he is upset to his parents turns to resentment toward his sister and sadness that his parents aren’t giving him as much attention (as it would for any child).  The Aspie child then gets into an argument with his sister (as siblings do) and breaks one of the strings on his sister’s guitar while yelling that her “Guitar is stupid!”  The parents become aware of this hostile argument on behalf of the Aspie child and begin to shift attention and focus on him instead.  The Aspie child may not like being the focus of negative attention, but as children go, he is still finally getting what he wanted in the first place; his parent’s attention.  The parents begin to focus on their son and why he behaved in such an inappropriate way and (after scolding and punishing him) begin to pay more attention to him in an attempt to promote positive behaviors.  This Aspie child just learned that Anger can yield effective results… even if they initially bring about negative ones.

    Care for one more?

    An Aspie child is trying to repair his broken RC car and is frustrated because everything he has tried will not get it to start up again.  His mother comes out to help him (she knows nothing about RC cars) and keeps kindly asking what is wrong, how it broke, or what he needs to do to fix it.  His mom is attempting to deescalate his growing frustration and “help” him, but the Aspie child is not reading her vocal tones and facial expressions that say, “I’m sorry you are frustrated honey, I would like to help you if I can.”  All he is hearing is his mother asking him questions (that he obviously doesn’t know the answer to or the car would be fixed) and distracting him further from the task at hand.  The more his mom tries to offer her assistance, the more frustrated he becomes.  Unable to see her actions as thoughtful and kind ones, he gets so mad he throws the car at the wall and stomps off.  His mom yells at him for his behavior and takes his car away altogether as punishment.  After a few days, the mom feels a little bad her son’s favorite hobby has been taken away and brings him to the store to buy a new RC car to replace his broken one (or finds someone with the ability to fix his old one).  This Aspie child just learned that even if he acts out in anger, sometimes he gets positive results to the original source of emotional frustration.  The Aspie child just learned that his anger was effective in making his mom go away, as well as yielding something he wanted in the end, even if he had to endure a week-long punishment first.

    I could go on and on with examples of how these behaviors occur in a child’s social and emotional development, but you get the point.  If anger is not handled appropriately and better communication skills taught, some children grow into adults who use anger as a predominant means to resolve their emotional frustration before they consider any other option.  This happens for both NT and Aspie men alike, and these men grow into very angry and difficult adults that become very angry and difficult husbands.

    This post is meant to offer the cause, thought-process, and challenges associated with this level of dominant anger in a relationship.  The next post to follow will address how to manage an angry husband, how to begin teaching him to stop using anger as a means to get results, and how to begin building communication to prevent it from reoccurring in the future and damaging a marriage.

    If you are unsure if you live with an ANGRY ASPIE HUSBAND, put a mental checkmark beside the statements you have personally thought or said aloud:

    1. I am tired of walking on eggshells to avoid his hostile behavior
    2. He is so selfish about… (insert your own response): money, sex, time, housework, childcare, etc.
    3. He’s so negative, there is no way to get through to him that will make him change.
    4. I have been nothing but patient and he hasn’t gotten any better… in fact, he has gotten worse.
    5. I am so sick of being treated with disrespect.
    6. Every time I attempt to talk to him about a subject that has emotional content (of any kind) we get into a fight or he ignores me for days.
    7. Everything pisses him off, I can’t even exist in our own home without feeling uptight.
    8. He treats me bad and when I try to tell him it hurts me, he gets angry and nasty until I stop talking about his actions and have to internalize my pain.
    9. I know he has to be as miserable as I am or he wouldn’t seem so angry all the time; so why doesn’t he want to work on fixing it like I do?
    10. I don’t even think he loves me or wants to spend time with me anymore.
    11. When I cry he calls me horrible names or completely ignores my tears.
    12. All he does is blame me for his negative moods, why can’t he see that he causes his own negativity (and everyone else’s)?
    13. Maybe he was born mean and I just didn’t see it in the beginning?
    14. I keep searching online for why Asperger’s syndrome causes anger and nothing accounts for my husband’s hostility.
    15. The more I try to prevent his anger and fail, the angrier I become. I wasn’t an angry person before I met my husband and I am so tired of being angry all the time.
    16. Every attempt at fixing our marriage leads to more hostility from him, maybe I should just stop trying.
    17. He doesn’t seem to have any emotions other than apathy or anger.
    18. I don’t know what else to do but leave/divorce him.

    Once again, I can keep going all day with a million other examples or quotes I have said both aloud and to myself in regard to my husband’s chronic and escalating anger… but you get the point.  My husband is mad; he is mad at the interruptions in his routine, mad at the dog, mad at the way people attack him, mad at the poor internet connection in the house, mad at the person who drank the last bit of coffee creamer, mad at the things that prevent him from progressing as an adult, mad about his past, mad about his perception of the future, etc.  My husband is mad AT ME.  My husband is mad AT THE WORLD.  My husband doesn’t have a clue what he is even mad at… he just knows he is mad and he wants to make damn sure I know it too!

     

    BUT WHY IS HE SO MAD?

    My husband grew up thinking the world was out to prove he was a bad person.  Despite growing up with an amazingly loving and supportive family, the absence of cognitive empathy made it impossible for him to see all of the nonverbal messages of love that he was given day after day.  My husband only heard the literal words that were spoken to him and they never felt like love in his mind, they felt like chronic criticism.  Without cognitive empathy, my husband was unaware of the nonverbal messages he was personally sending to those he interacted with.  He could never see that he came across as angry or dismissive and therefore, was responded to with equal anger and dismissiveness.

    All of this confusion that gets generated into feelings of internal pain, created by the perception that those around him had unfairly labeled him a bad person.  All of this injustice made him respond outwardly with anger… and that anger protected him or yielded desired results.  Even if it was only effective 1 out of 10 times, it was more effective than any other emotion he learned to utilize in response to his social interactions, so it became the one that ruled.

    ANGER BECAME MY HUSBAND’S DEFAULT EMOTION

    Does my husband have the self-awareness to identify and openly admit to how mad he always seems to feel?  Nope.  Does my husband know he is taking his anger out on the women who are trying desperately to love him and prevent him from feeling so mad?  Nope.  Does my husband think he is behaving in a way that even indicates he is feeling angry?  Nope.  Does my husband realize that he has caused his wife and stepdaughter to feel angry in response to him? Nope.

    Does my husband’s anger serve as an outlet for ALL of the other emotions he experiences as an adult (sadness, guilt, fear, anxiety, jealousy, rejection, blame, etc.); the emotions he does not know how to identify or even begin to deal with?

    YES!

     

    HE’S BEGINNING TO OPEN HIS EYES

     

    My husband said something very powerful to me a few weeks ago that really got me thinking about how to tackle the topic of anger and how it is ruining marriages that could otherwise be successful.  It is difficult to express to an outsider what it is like to live with a constant threat of hostility from your husband, or to try to explain how his use of anger trumps every other human emotion neurotypicals experience in a given year, month, week, or even day.  Since I haven’t any doubt that “Asperger’s syndrome and Anger” is a subject matter that begs of answers from those in marriages like mine, I am going to take a crack at explaining what is happening beneath the surface for you.

    Less than a month ago, I was attempting to clean my messy closet for the hundredth time in weeks and despite struggling to have enough energy to tackle this cluttered disaster, I managed to find the drive to attempt it.  I had been throwing loads of clean clothes onto the floor for days, where a blanket served as the buffer to keep them “clean” enough to put them away when I finally got around to it.  I had been working long consecutive shifts at the hospital and daunting as it seemed, organizing my closet felt like an accomplishment that might make my mind feel less disordered, so I knew it was important for me to do this.

    Midway through the job (surrounded by clothes and stacks of random documents and books) I was caught off guard by my husband John (who sat on the bed near my closet) vocalizing a muddled remark about our daughter (his stepdaughter) before he abruptly walked out of the room.  I felt a twinge of angry poison spilling into my bloodstream and followed my husband out to the back porch to challenge the snarky comment he had just made.

    My husband had been impenetrably antagonistic with me for days over a topic that I wanted to resolve… so that our family could move forward as a functioning unit.  Every attempt I had made at bringing this topic up with John (in the previous week) had failed miserably and led to a backlash of venting rage (directed at me).  The topic was about positive parenting and how he and his stepdaughter had lost the ability to enjoy one another’s company.  I desperately wanted to see that change for the better, so I kept working at it.

    Despite John making a snide remark while I was attempting to clean, I opted to approach his clear desire to engage me on the issue once more, in the hopes I could spin it into a calm and meaningful chat.  I even had a split second thought that a solution or plan could come out of this new attempt.  As I sat down on the porch to engage my husband, I intended to share positive suggestions I had to help rebuild the damage that was inadvertently done (by him mostly), that severed the relationship they once had.  I did not assign blame to him alone (for obvious reasons) but that did not stop John’s knee-jerk response of bitter anger.  John perceived my thoughtful advice as an attack on his character and a list of reasons he was to blame for everything my daughter had ever done to misbehave or dodge accountability and household responsibility.  I do not believe my daughter is anything but a loving and kind soul who has gone out of her way (and beyond her expected level of maturity) to be patient and understanding with her stepfather, so despite agreeing that she has been complacent with personal responsibility lately (she is only 16-years old), I found his synopsis of her general behavior to be unwarranted and unnecessarily cold.

    I am not bullshitting when I say that I have an extraordinarily mature and compassionate daughter (“B”) whose empathy and grace astounds me daily.  The more aggressively John came at me, suggesting his stepdaughter was an irresponsible spoiled brat, the more aggressively I defended her.  Since John fails to see the phenomenal woman she is becoming, I feel resentful toward him each and every time he criticizes her without ever acknowledging her remarkable character and strength.  All of my efforts to help them rebuild a positive relationship have always focused around convincing John to give her acknowledgement first, so that she will feel motivated to respond to him with love when he points out a flaw or poor behavior she has.  John staunchly refuses to do this, so each time he responds to me with such a defiant stance of refusal to show B love, I lose the ability to entertain anything else he has to say about her.  Actually, the more he does this, the more I want to jump across the room and jab my fingers into his eyeballs… but that is just an internal thought I do not openly share.

     Moms can be psychotically protective of their children, and I am no exception.

    I could sense my own “mom-rage” escalating, so I quietly returned to my messy closet to distract myself from the failed communication attempt we just had.  I was unable to disengage from the resentment I felt toward my husband for his words and I was heartbroken that my efforts, meant to bring closeness and love between my daughter and husband, were dissected and deemed irrelevant by him instead.  I sat in the middle of my closet and felt the tears welling up in my eyes and a knot in my throat.  I could literally feel the acid in my stomach climbing its way upward toward my esophagus to remind me how physically impaired I am becoming these days in addition to my diminished mental capacity (from being overworked and sleep deprived mostly).  It is hard to describe the feeling of energy draining from your body, but I felt mine was literally leaking out of me.  It felt like my core was hollowed out rather quickly and my entire body felt useless.  My butt was planted on the cold tile of my closet floor as I attempted to continue weeding through months of documents (bills, work stuff, personal writings, etc.) hoping to bring a small bit of tangible order to the chaos of my life.  With my chest burning (from a likely ulcer I have yet to do anything about) and an overwhelming sense of impending doom, I fell to my knees and clutched my head in my hands as I dug my elbows into the cold, hard surface beneath them.

    I was tired, my body was tired, my brain was tired, and all I could think about was how much John breaks my heart when he comes at me (or my daughter) with an anger that only he seems to possess.  I began to quietly sob (I did not want John to hear me).

    To my surprise, John appeared behind me and hovered behind my body for some time… silent.  He stood there for several minutes and finally asked me what “was wrong?”  He asked me to get off the floor, and eventually… he asked me to stop “being ridiculous.”  I did not have the desire or energy to even respond to him, so I remained lost in my own sadness and did not move.  I did not move for well-over ten minutes, but John remained upright behind me in the closet doorway.  He continued to ask me to get up every minute or so with no response from me.  He continued to ask me what was wrong, with no reply on my part.  In a soft and gentle tone of voice, my husband began to speak with words that mattered.  He said, “Kara, I don’t know what to say.  I don’t know what you want me to say.  I know that you know what I should say… but I don’t. I’m afraid of saying the wrong thing and making it worse.”

    I remained in the same position (not purposely, I just truly felt too weak to get up) and did not respond.  My husband then stepped into the closet and closed the door behind him, shutting out the light from the bedroom so we were enclosed in a tiny space together, in total darkness.  He remained silent for a few minutes, as did I.  Then John did something I would have never imagined him to do; he sat down on the cold floor behind me and scooped up my fragile statue-like self and pulled me in close to him.  He held me tight in his arms and put his head on my back.  He told me that he didn’t want to see me hurting and that he just didn’t know what to say.

    For what felt like an eternity, John held me close and tried (with all his ability) to communicate with me.  I remained silent with only pathetic sniffles to offer in response to his effort.  A year ago, my audible sound of crying (meek as it was), would have sent John into a terribly cruel flurry of words suggesting I was a “dramatic mess” who needed mental health counseling.  John did not do this.  He just sat on the floor of my closet with his arms wrapped snuggly around me.

     

    BUT WE HAVE COME SO FAR… 

    John and I have come a million miles from where we stood less than a year ago, but we still have a ton of “unresolved” issues that continue to rear their ugly faces; they come without any warning of their impending visit and always ruin a day that could have been wonderful.  Actually, the only residual glitches that still threaten to destroy our otherwise happy marriage belong to John’s surface personalities, Mr. Mean, Mr. Rage, Mr. Defiance, Mr. Antagonistic, and Mr. ANGER.  No matter what I try to do to protect my husband’s wonderful personality from being temporarily morphed into one of these bastards, they always manage to arrive with more power and attitude than the time before.  Despite John holding me close and behaving in a way I was NOT used to, (it stunned me into silence… I am not even kidding), I still found myself bracing for the arrival of one of those body-snatching jackasses to begin talking on my husband’s behalf.

    John’s evil exterior personalities never showed up that night.  Instead, John began to talk about what was wrong, without me requesting anything from him.  He told me he knows “exactly what is wrong with our relationship.”  Despite his next words being an understatement of the obvious and something I had easily identified around the six-month mark of our union, John spoke with an odd sense of pride that he had stumbled on something valuable.  He said, “We don’t know how to communicate with one another” and “I am the one who fails at this the most.”

    It never occurred to me that John had never shared his thoughts on why we struggled for so long until that night.  Maybe he did not grasp what I meant when I kept throwing similar statements out there for half a decade… maybe it finally made sense to him?

    John continued to talk openly (often with excessively long pauses in between words or thoughts).  He reflected on how hard he had been trying lately by saying, “I know I do not have a job right now, but I have been trying SO hard to make our home “my job” and to work really hard at making it nice, the way you always asked me to, so that I can show you that I care.”  I let him talk.  He continued on to say, “I know it is not the same as the responsibilities you have to make money for our family, but it is all I can do right now on this island.  I have been trying to show you that I can put my effort into compensating for what I cannot do… until I can begin working when we get back to the states.”

    Where John’s words would have felt like an excuse in the past, they were not this time around because he truly had been working his ass off to change the previous lazy behavior he displayed when it came to basic adult responsibilities.  John had been in Michigan doggedly working all summer (from refinishing a basement to working in heating and cooling with his father) and he brought home more money from those three months of true effort than he had contributed in our 5.5-year long relationship.  When he returned to the island we live on, he continued his efforts and began to finally do all that I had asked of him for so many years.  I used to beg him to just try to match some of his efforts working in the home to the effort I put forth working outside the home, but he never would.  John has really made me feel both acknowledged and valued with his physical labors lately (and when he was working this summer).  Because I did not want him to ever think his efforts went without notice, I broke my frozen silence and said, “I know you have and I am so appreciative of everything you have been doing lately.”

    To this, John seemed to soften a bit more and push the conversation a little further than he had ever before.  He began talking about our daughter again; I felt like the party-crashers were on the way in, so I quickly asked him if he could stop talking about that subject right now because it would only fuel anger that I find too difficult to dial back.  I told him that discussing B got us “nowhere fast” in the end anyway.  He replied by telling me that he was not “angry” he was “hurt.”  Without intending to sound like a bitch, I softly (but firmly) fired back, “Maybe it is hurt you feel inside, but all I see is anger.  You are always SO ANGRY about everything John.  You are so angry I feel like I cannot get past that emotion enough to ever address the real ones you are feeling.”

    My husband then validated something I had long-believed to be the real reason behind his constant state of hostility.  He said, “I don’t know what to say, ever, so I say nothing.  I feel so many things inside, but I don’t know how to explain them to you, so I get angry.  It is so much easier for me to be angry all the time than try to explain the other things I am feeling.  I don’t know how to talk about those things Kara.”

    What an INCREDIBLE thing to hear my husband finally articulate to me in words, as he held me in his arms on the floor of my dark closet.  I paused for a few minutes to make sure John was finished talking and then gently asked him, “Why?”  John continued to try to explain his anger by telling me that when he was young, he didn’t understand why people were always accusing him of things or telling him he was wrong (mind you, John has NEVER read any of the posts in this blog that talk about my thoughts on his childhood).  He said that because of his inability to understand the emotions other people directed at him, he became angry in response because it was just, “So much easier.”

    I found myself crying again (quietly) as he spoke these words to me and mumbled, “You can’t like feeling angry all the time John, it has to hurt.”  John replied, “Yeah, I guess it does.”  I figured this was my best shot at getting “buy-in” from him to begin changing his anger, so I asked, “Don’t you want to stop feeling angry all of the time?”  John told me that he did desire the ability to replace his anger with appropriate emotions, but due to his difficulties sharing them, or even making sense of them in his own mind, he often preferred to take the “easy road” and default to anger because it was an instant defense to shut people out and ignore the real emotions he had.

    Getting angry gave my husband the smoke and mirrors he needed to get the hell outta dodge…

    before anyone noticed how “screwed up” his mind was.

    John held me in his arms for over 30-minutes that night as we spoke in a near-whisper, with his face pressed up against the back of my head; on a closet floor; in pitch blackness.  Weird but… maybe this is just the kind of thing Aspie-NT couples have to do to engage one another in a conversation that does not involve anger?  Maybe they need to be boxed into a confined space in the darkness where yelling or running seem like less viable options?

    Eventually, I was able to peel myself off the floor and take medicine (that John brought me) to soothe my burning gut.  By the time we stood up to attempt normal human functioning, we both felt calm and closer to one another.  We both felt heard, we both felt loved, and we both agreed to work harder at communicating better.

    Our daughter B had been watching movies with her boyfriend “A” during the entire exchange John and I were having outside of their awareness.  It was getting late and A had to be driven home (school night) so I began to tell them it was getting close to “go” time.

     

                    B’s boyfriend lives across the island and because of the limited availability of reliable used vehicles here, and the challenge in getting a teenager a driver’s license for the first time (if their parents do not hold a license for the island), neither he nor B have the potential of driving themselves to and from social engagements with one another.  Unfortunately, a simple trip to one another’s home takes a solid 90-minutes out of the parents day/evening to accomplish.  John bitches about this often, but it is usually something I feel worthy of committing my time to because A is just as freakishly kind and compassionate as B is; as teenagers, the typical fear a parent would have of allowing them social engagements (outside of school) does not apply to these two.  John often starts arguments with me about our daughter’s “teenage crush” and attempts to squash her “fantasy” of marrying A someday.  While I would have agreed with this fantasy-future under most circumstances of teenage love, I have surprisingly viewed my daughter’s first boyfriend as an actual possibility for her future. 

                    I truly appreciate the relationship B has found at such an early age and often pray that she and A will defy the odds of building their high school love into a life together.  They are both more comparable to old souls who would rather concoct a plan to save the planet then engage in a make-out session.  They just seem to be meant for one another in a way few mothers would be willing to consider and A’s mom has shared the same sentiments with me.  In fact, just the other night she and I were messaging one another and she commented that she used to wish B was a “little asshole” so she could find fault in her that deemed her unworthy of her son’s love.  Ultimately, she said she just couldn’t find a single reason to feel anything but love for the incredible child I have been blessed with and that she too, embarrassingly hopes they end up together because she cannot fathom her son would ever again find a girl so perfectly matched to his empathetic and delicate heart.  Our children both had father’s with suspected bipolar disorder and while B’s dad killed himself, A’s dad theoretically did the same with substance abuse; they were both abandoned by their biological fathers for life.  Despite raising two emotionally fragile and deeply caring children, the path of sadness and loneliness we thought they were destined to travel, seemed to veer off into happiness and passion for life when they met one another.  It helps that they are both unapologetically honest with their mother’s (almost to a fault); there are some things a kid just doesn’t tell their parent and these two don’t seem to grasp that concept. 

                     John gets angry when I talk about how much I like A or how much I think they are different from typical teenagers.  He seems to want to prove this theory wrong or convince me that B is not the honest and responsible teenager I know she is (I tried to consider myself naïve and doubt her maturity… but she has proven me wrong to date and now warrants my continued faith in her).  John and I have had many arguments over my willingness to support our daughter’s ability to see her boyfriend outside of school and calls me “stupid” a lot for trusting her to make good decisions in regard to sex and safety.  I have tried to tell John if he took the time to talk to A, he would realize what a phenomenal young man he is and that he may even enjoy being a mentor to him, since A has a passion for cars much the same way John does.  With cars being one of John’s special interests, I know that A would be delighted to learn from him and fascinated by the amount of knowledge he has to share.  I also know that it would bring my husband an incredible feeling of pride to be able to teach a young man like A everything he knows, both because he loves when he can share his interests with others, and because we will never have a son of our own that he can share the typical “father-son” activities with that I know A would be thrilled to have (A does have a wonderful stepfather who raised him and shares these things with him).  Whenever I bring up the suggestion that, “You should talk to A” with John, he immediately shoots it down and tells me he “doesn’t like him.”  I accept that John is applying logic to the whole teenage-relationship dynamic, so I usually stop the urging immediately after he dismisses it. 

                     It has long-since occurred to me that if John and A could spend a little time together working on cars, talking about them, or watching car-focused shows; it might enable a closer relationship with John and his own daughter.  Since B is smitten by A, if John would willingly accept his presence in our household (even if he believes he will be a distant memory after we move), the four of us might be able to go out together for a day of fun activities.  As it stands, the three of us cannot make it through a single outing without John saying something offensive to B that I end up admonishing him for (the very second I recognize her nonverbal expressions of sadness or anger).  I believe John instigates this common dynamic because he feels alienated by the bond B and I have with one another and the way we are constantly communicating with nonverbal messages he does not hear.  I haven’t any doubt that the words we DO end up saying out loud get lost in translation without the words we are not vocalizing, and this leads to chronic misinterpretations from where John stands, causing him to make snarky comments in our direction.  This happens without fail every single time we try to go out with one another as a family, so we rarely attempt it these days.  Because of my desperate desire to still be able to leave our damn house as a family, I believe that adding A to the mix could enable this to peacefully occur.  If there was one more person to offset John feeling like the third wheel in our outings, he would undoubtedly behave in a less threatened manner (experience has proven this to be true).  To be able to have fun outings together without the incessant intrusion of hostility, B would get more time to see the wonderful side of her stepfather that has been invisible to her in the last two years. 

    Of course, all of this was only wishful thinking for me…

    until the night I became a paralyzed disaster on my closet floor….

    As I was getting dressed to take A home, John volunteered to do it himself, something I found very thoughtful since I did have to wake up at 4 a.m. and it was already almost 9 p.m.  I graciously accepted his offer and spent the remaining two hours alone in my house with a sense of peaceful calm.  My husband had openly communicated with me and physically showed me he was willing to drop himself onto the cold ground in darkness, if that was what he needed to do to show me I was not alone anymore.  There were few words that could express how much this meant to me.

    B would later reflect on this car ride and tell me that John had engaged her boyfriend A for the first time that night and the two of them spent the entire drive across island talking about their love of cars.  She shared how John even expressed to her that he liked A very much and was “impressed” with his knowledge.  I could tell by the light in my daughter’s eyes that John’s willingness to connect with someone she found important, made her feel equally valued by her stepfather for the first time in a long time.  B also said that the remainder of the car ride back to our house was filled with John being silly, kind, and compassionate toward her and she felt like he “actually liked” being around her.  I did not know this experience ever transpired after the “closet-incident” until last week, when B was crying about John’s insensitivities once again (how she felt deflated by his anger) after he had just given her so much hope things were improving between them.

    UH OH…. Our daughter is beginning to respond to John’s anger with the same level of personal devastation that her mother has felt….

     SHIT… SOMETHING’S GOTTA CHANGE, AND IT’S GOTTA CHANGE FAST!

     

    WHAT HAPPENED?

    Despite John stepping outside his comfort zone that night, enough to perfectly respond to my pain, and despite John abandoning his opinions on B and her boyfriend long enough to give my suggestion a chance (making B feel loved) …. John’s anger still proved to be insurmountable within a few days of that amazing night.  It was only two days later that he and I were right back at square one, as he aggressively vented about B’s behavior to me and then viciously yelled at me when I attempted to offer suggestions to bridge their communication gap once more.  It was within a week that John’s anger boiled over to the point of verbally screaming at B and calling her “AN ASSHOLE” while I was at work (something that took all of my willpower to not physically attack him for).  It was inconceivable that despite all of the incredibly difficult effort he put into finding the words to express his feelings and love that night on the closet floor… he had once again been absorbed by his incessant need to act out in anger.

    WHY??????

    While there are “specific” causes that my husband would point out for what fueled his “justified” anger once again, I realized that I was doing something terribly wrong this entire time in the way I responded to it.  My husband disclosed to me that he used his anger to gain control over his confusing emotions and to take control back from me when I expressed emotions he had difficulty processing.  Why didn’t I break down the simplicity of this a long time ago?

    IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN ABOUT CONTROL!

     

    CONTROL

    Most NT-e women are bright enough to realize that inappropriate expressions of emotions have an underlying purpose… to gain control over one’s own feelings.  We know this.  This makes perfect sense.  Despite being cognitively aware of the root cause, we continue to allow our Aspie husband’s to control our emotions and feelings.  We give our husband’s the very thing they are seeking to obtain when they aggressively come at us with anger.

    We give them power and we give them control.

    We continuously validate their actions as being effective ones and we enhance their use of them to acquire greater power over us in the future.

     

    IN THE BEGINNING

    When we first met and subsequently fell in love with our Aspie husbands, they treated us well.  They may not have had the skills of a neurotypical man to identify our nonverbal messages and desires (and be able to appropriately respond to them), but they were generally loving and kind men who made us feel valued.  Even if there always lacked the intense emotional connection and deep understanding of one another’s feelings that NT-NT relationships experience, there was an emotional connection in our Aspie-NT union, and it was just as real and warm as we thought it was at the time.

    So what happened then, if our husbands were once able to show us attention, respect, interest, attraction, love, and kindness?  What happened to that gentle, intelligent man we fell in love with?  What happened to the man we were utterly convinced lacked the capacity to ever cause us emotional pain or inflict malicious displays of anger toward us?

    SERIOUSLY… WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED TO THOSE MEN?!?!?

    They got us; that’s what happened. They secured our love and commitment, and they no longer felt the threat of losing us.  This absent “fear of loss” enabled a complacency in the effort it took for them to gain our affection in the first place.

    Is it that simple?

    If it is… then doesn’t that make them assholes?

    No… not at all.

    This same change in behavior occurs with many NT husbands who go from seemingly perfect to shockingly selfish, withdrawn, and angry men… somewhere in the midst of the relationship arriving at a monotonous daily existence.  This happens for the same reasons with both NT and Aspie husbands.  The difference is, Aspie men are far more internally focused and oblivious to the wants and needs of their partner than the NT men are.  Aspie men did not begin with exceptional communication skills, nor did they ever have the cognitive empathy to identify the nonverbal messages they were receiving or putting out to the women they loved.  Aspie men were always missing the majority of information that NT men were capable of receiving, so this caused their dramatic shift to appear a billion times more severe and intolerably cruel than that of the equally angry NT man.

     

    IT ALL STEMMED FROM SECURING OUR LOVE?

    Most men are inherently similar in the sense that the majority of them have fragile egos (call it nature or nurture, this is an unarguable fact that no amount of research will ever disprove).  Men hate the concept of being rejected by someone they desire; they hate this thought far more than they hate the concept of living in an unhappy relationship.  Of the men who possess this instinctive drive to protect their ego, there are men who are exceptional communicators.  These men tend to form healthy and happy relationships and their ego is suppressed in favor of mutual respect and appreciation.  Then there are the men who are so incredibly inept when it comes to social skills (think of the “nerd” stereotype given when someone first hears the term Asperger’s syndrome), that they rarely make it past the second date with a woman to form a long-term relationship (although sometimes they are lucky and find a woman equally challenged in social function to co-exist with).

    Finally, there are the Aspie husbands like my husband John, and all of your husbands.

    These men fall somewhere in between the other two, but almost in a parallel universe despite having the common bond of a fragile male ego.  Men like our husbands have learned enough social etiquette (be it from family, friends, casual observations, failed attempts at forming relationships, watching movies, reading books, etc.); they have learned enough to effectively start relationships that appear emotionally healthy and positive in the beginning.  These men put all of their efforts and energy into the early days of “securing” the woman they want to be with, and it is just enough for the women to miss the cues that something will be terribly lacking a few short steps down the road.

    For men like this (most of our Aspie husbands) … the duration of their relationship will be entirely dependent on the tolerance and endurance the NT woman is able to manifest along the way.  By the time the relationship evolves to legally joining as husband and wife, the NT spouse knows damned-well her husband once had the capacity to communicate in a non-hostile way, and she knows he is more than capable of interacting with her without utilizing anger in response to every communication attempt she makes… she knows this because she has seen him do it!!

    What she does not realize, is that her husband (and those like him) are thoroughly exhausted from their previous efforts to secure the relationship; it was the greatest social challenge they ever took on in their entire life.  Once these men no longer feel threatened that they will lose their wife, they succumb to the level of effort they really “want” to put forth in their social exchanges.  They might still respond to the fear of losing their wife intermittently, when they feel threatened by another man for instance (that ego is still there).  In rare instances like this, their efforts may be combated the way they initially tried to secure their wife.  Considering these men miss most nonverbal messages that even indicate a potential threat on the horizon, and they certainly do not have a clue they are in danger of losing their wife by their own poor behaviors, they do not respond to them with any degree of urgency to step up and protect their prize.  Aspie men are a million times less likely to ever identify that their negative behavior is a looming threat to the relationship because they lack the cognitive empathy to identify the nonverbal messages their wife is sending them to sound the alarm bells of potential calamity.

    The entire time the Aspie husband begins to slowly withdraw his exhaustive effort to “secure” his wife, the NT wife is enacting the worst possible means of responding to his withdrawal.  The NT wife will try to push more love, more effort in communicating, more verbalized feelings of disconnect, more displays of patience and understanding, and way more submissive behaviors… all in an attempt to nonverbally scream to her husband that their relationship is in danger.  All the NT wife wants is to have her husband GO BACK to the man she fell in love with.

     

    CHANGE BACK TO THE WAY YOU WERE… PLEASE CHANGE BACK!

    NT wives want their husband to return to the gentle, calm, kind man he once was; the man who put effort into treating her like a valued and cherished prize he was lucky enough to win.

    Aspie husbands are not going to do this on their own!

    Once they feel they have secured the relationship, they will exert only the bare minimum amount of effort needed (in their mind) to maintain it.  This is not because they do not love you, it is because the sheer magnitude of debilitating energy it took to obtain your commitment (in the first place) surpassed all of the combined energy they ever exerted in their lifetime toward any interpersonal relationship (about 100X more).

    Ultimately, the real reason Aspie husbands show lessening efforts as the years dredge on is because…

    YOU LET THEM GET AWAY WITH IT!!!

    Your Aspie husband’s declination in expending emotional and physical energy to show his love for you is inadvertently your fault because you allowed him to do this.  As he began withdrawing effort (because the threat of losing you was gone), he was NOT met by a wife who refused to tolerate his unwanted behavior.  Instead, he was met with a bewildered woman who did not understand what the hell happened and went out of her way to stick it out as she tried to uncover the reason.  As the NT wife searched for answers for her husband’s changing behavior, the husband realized (consciously or not) that he could sustain the marriage without having to exert any more effort than he was currently offering.

    Why would he exhaust himself proving a love that he no longer had to prove (in his mind)?

     

    WHY MESS WITH A SYSTEM THAT WORKS?

    How many times have you watched men fix up a broken piece of machinery, from an old car to a junkie lawnmower, and insist that they will not purchase a new one because the old one “STILL WORKS”?

    When bad behavior or minimal effort is “working” to keep their wife in the marriage…

    there is no reason for an Aspie husband to mess with their “functioning” system by adopting new behaviors.

    Eventually, I am going to take the lawnmower example to the extreme to show you how Angry-Aspie husbands will continue using something that works (anger) at the risk of time, energy, frustration, money, or quality… if they believe it still works for them.  I am going to show you how it does not matter if their lawnmower (anger) only yields results 10% of the time they use it… they will continue to use it and ignore any other lawnmower (positive emotion) that could replace the broken one based on their 10% success rate.

     

    THE ASPIE LAW OF CHANGE

    Let’s say an Aspie husband has an old junkie lawnmower that he has had (and fixed up) for many years which drives his wife insane.  Even if this man knew he could easily purchase a brand new, state of the art lawnmower that took fractions of the energy to mow the lawn that his old one did… he is not going to abandon it until it is completely broken and unquestionably useless.  Even if this lawnmower loudly screams down the yard while emitting noxious fumes to the entire neighborhood, the Aspie husband is going to keep on using this beast until it catastrophically fails for the last time and he has absolutely NO OTHER CHOICE but to find a new one.

     Remember, like this lawnmower, your Aspie husband’s anger has nothing to do with the overall functionality of success it yields (and this is the most bizarre part), he will willingly accept the ONE time that his angry behavior accomplishes its intended purpose over the THIRTY times it does not.

     To your Aspie husband, that ONE time his anger yields the desired result he was seeking,

    is enough validation that his behavior WORKS;

    and when something works, it is worth repeating.

     

          TRACKING?

     

     

    If not, let me try to clarify:  If your husband has to deal with 49 intense, aggressive, and emotionally debilitating arguments with you before you willingly concede to his side being the RIGHT ONE… he will do it.  If your husband tries to use anger as a means to thwart or stop an emotionally-charged conversation with you, and 1 time out of 50 times you break down and cry or run away instead of fighting back or pushing the subject matter… he will continue to do it.  He will always willingly endure the 49-shit storms that do not end with him being proven right or you abandoning a topic he does not want to discuss, for that ONE TIME he gets you to back down and allow his angry behavior to dominate your better judgement.  Even if it is wreaking physical and emotional damage on him personally to go through those 49 other fights, it will not matter.  The effort and collateral damage is worth it to him because the idea of changing his behavior is FAR MORE daunting than going with the one he is acclimated to using as a default to get his way, avoid confrontation, or prove a point.

    You can spin yourself in circles and try every single possible means of altering your husband’s angry behavior, but you will fail overall if you allow him to get away with it…

    even if it is only 1 out of every 50 times.

    Maybe you disagree with this concept.  Perhaps you have been imploring the new knowledge you have about cognitive empathy and you are finding your marriage slowly (but steadily) improving.  Maybe you once had a 95% failure rate in meaningful communication and now you only have a 15% failure rate.  While that would be amazing (and I am super stoked for you) … if that 15% failure rate is because of your husband’s anger… you are nowhere closer to success than you were when communication failed 95% of the time!

    I am not talking about abolishing angry feelings in general, you are both human and you are both going to get angry from time to time.  Being angry on occasion is perfectly acceptable.  Vocalizing anger can also be accepted and/or forgiven by both parties in the future (and should be), because anger is a natural human emotion.  What I am talking about is your husband’s use of anger to achieve, avoid, or justify something in the marriage.  I am talking about a husband who responds with anger over any other emotion, even if he can later identify the true feelings he had and apologize for his initial response of hostility.

    I am talking about a husband who uses anger as a means of obtaining power and control.

     

    If you allow your husband to do this… ever…

     from this day forward…

    you will not make a single step of progress in your marriage.

     

    Sorry to burst the bubble of happiness you had going for you after years of sadness, but this is important.  I know it feels like progress now that you have a better understanding of “why” he acts the way he does, and it is a step in the right direction, but it is not actual “progress” until he changes the behavior that is the most toxic to your marriage.  If your husband has learned to use anger as a dominant means to respond to conflict, your husband is always going to default to this instinctive behavior, even if he has grown enough to begin reflecting on a fight and apologizing after the fact.

    You may be thrilled he can now acknowledge and apologize after he has handled a situation poorly with his anger, but again, this is not “progress” toward a happy marriage.  It is not progress because each time he defaults to hostility, you will feel the same level of disrespect, devastation, and pain that you felt when he never returned later to apologize.  If you continue to feel that your husband does not value, love, or respect you… even if it is once in a blue moon… it is still ONE TOO MANY TIMES and has no place in a marriage.

    Think about it like this…   If an abusive husband beats his wife daily and then attends counseling (which motivates the wife to give the marriage a second chance), would it be acceptable if he only beat her once a year, perhaps on New Year’s Eve?

     

    FUCK NO IT WOULDN’T BE!!!!

     

     

    Why wouldn’t it be?  Because that behavior is destructive to ever having a mutually beneficial marriage based off of love and respect.  It is not acceptable, in any regard, even “once in a blue moon.”  The wife who convinces herself that it is alright to take an “annual beating” because she is so thankful she no longer has to endure them daily… she needs to wake up.  The wife that convinces herself he will get better because he has come “so far” in his efforts… she is going to be sorry.  If a physically abusive man claims he has changed his ways and defaults to physical violence ever again, the woman in his life can count on the fact that at some point… the stress in his life will bring the daily beatings back.  They will return, and they may return at a more lethal level, because he has not learned that this violent response is NEVER acceptable and never going to yield him the result he was seeking when he unleashed its fury. Accepting a return to violence even once is equivalent to accepting it 100% of the time because it reinforces the knowledge that when all else fails… THAT WILL WORK.

     

    If your Aspie husband believes that anger can effectively get the results he wants: to prove he is right, his opinion is correct, his actions, or method of doing something is just…  he will continue to default to it every time…

     UNTIL IT NO LONGER PRODUCES ONE SINGLE DESIRED RESULT!

    HOW COULD THEY NOT GRASP THIS?

    Aspie men have endured a lifetime of being told they are wrong, their thoughts are incorrect, and their behaviors or emotional responses are abnormal or inappropriate.  They grow up in a world that does not know they lack cognitive empathy and therefore, they grow up in a world that treats them like an alien from another planet when they openly express their perception of reality (which may vary greatly from the majority).  Aspie men have been groomed by a society of “naysayers” and social injustices that had them fighting “their” take on reality every step of the way.

    Some boys and men with Asperger’s syndrome submit to the masses and isolate themselves from social interactions altogether….

    These are NOT the Aspie husbands we are married to!

    We are married to the special group of Aspie men who have such an internal belief in who they are as a person (that they are a good man without mal-intent or insane perspectives), so instead of withdrawing from life, these men became FIGHTERS!  These men are amazing.  They are strong-willed and they can move mountains with their innate resilience and brilliance, especially if they join forces with an equally strong-willed NT-e.

    These men are fighters unlike most men in society, and they do so with pure and selfless intentions… they do so because they strongly believe in the knowledge they have and the inner battle to triumph over injustice and/or ignorance.  These men have a fighting spirit that comes from deep within their soul… and they will stop AT NOTHING and on NO ONE’S ACCOUNT to prove their worth in a world that has devalued them their entire lives.

    THAT IS THE ASPIE MAN YOU ARE MARRIED TO!

    Your husband’s strength of character is a gift and something to be marveled at.  It takes an unbelievably magnificent human to defy all the world’s hurtful and negative energy and absorb it enough to transform it into an energy that gives them the will to keep fighting.

    Think about that (from outside the box) for a moment.

    Your husband is a fighter (as are you) and for that… you should be in awe.  Unfortunately, these are the men that will fight 9,999 battles to win 1.  These are the men that possess the stamina to argue their point to the death and beat their opponent into submission if they believe in their core, that their truth is the only one that is correct.

    These are not men who ever set out to inflict harm, pain, sadness, injury, or misery to anyone else.  They are not even aware that their unwavering believes cause those resulting feelings for anyone else (particularly their NT wife).  They don’t have the cognitive empathy to recognize that their own actions are causing their wife to suffer, unless she manages to tell him this with direct, logical words.  Even then… if the logic for hurt feelings she expresses is being pinned on something they did not intend to do (and fail to believe they are responsible for), they will dismiss it with the same passion they do everything else.  They will fight you.

     With the same breath I took to tell you that your husband’s strength of character is a gift,

    a real marvel…

    it is also his Achilles Heel.

    Your husband is willing to suffer unimaginable amounts of misery and withstand countless negative consequences to stand his ground and get his one belief across to you until you accept it as correct.  Your husband will unknowingly ignore all of the unnecessary risks and negative outcomes possible in order to prove the validity of that one thing he stands behind.

     

    HOW THIS LOOKED IN MY MARRIAGE

    In my marriage, the internet search for “Relationship Advice” is a perfect example of my husband’s unrelenting fight to the death.  My husband independently went online to learn about Asperger’s syndrome after receiving his diagnosis and came across articles that suggested he was an “inherently evil man from birth” and “could never be a good husband or love me”.  He read a few (too many) hate-filled blogs filled with rhetoric that begged and pleaded with NT women to get the hell away from the toxic sociopaths that ARE Aspies.  My husband read these things and he was DONE.

    He made up his mind that there would NEVER come a day he would EVER AGAIN CONSIDER READING A SINGLE THING ONLINE ABOUT ASPERGER’S SYNDROME!

    I spent years begging him to read articles I found beneficial.  I emailed them to him, printed them out for him, attempted to read them to him… he refused.  I could have listed 100,000 happily married Aspie-NT couples who read just ONE short article with the secret to changing their marriage into a successful one; that promised to do this overnight without effort, and my husband would have STILL REFUSED TO READ IT.  When I brought up the subject, I was met with nasty aggressiveness to make me stop trying to force something on him he had zero intention of doing.  When I came at him with gentle, soft, kind words about it, he responded with anger.  When I demanded he do it to prove he loved me, his anger boiled over to the point of verbal abuse.

    The only time my husband ever responded the way I wanted was when I threatened to leave him if he did not “educate” himself (by way of the internet).  Despite pacifying me with promises that he would read (when he thought his resistance might actually threaten our relationship), he still never did.

    His actions were out of the inner belief that he was a good man, I was a good woman, and no one else on the planet had the potential to define our relationship other than the two of us.  That was the reason John refused to ever listen to my pleas for him to read a single thing on the computer over the 4+ years I begged him to.  My husband did not intend to hurt me with his refusal (quite the opposite, he thought it was going to protect our relationship).  John did not believe this was a good idea and he held strong to it… against any possible consequence his refusal to do so might bring upon him.

    That’s the thing about our Aspie husbands. 

    They have a damned-good reason behind the majority of their hostile and defiant behaviors.

    When they use anger to get their point across,

    they render us incapable of ever comprehending their reason.

    Our husbands are good men and our husbands do not secretly conspire to bring emotional suffering unto us.  Every seemingly cruel behavior that comes at us as angry words or actions… they are based off of an internal belief that they are going to be beneficial to us.  Our husbands do not have malicious or entirely self-serving purpose behind the mass majority of the arguments they engage us in.

     

    STOP THREATENING, START DOING

    I literally threatened our entire marriage if my husband did not take the time to research online information about his diagnosis and the impact it had on our relationship.  I spent countless hours looking for ways around his refusal and ridiculous amounts of time searching for an opportunity to sway his defiance into one of open consideration.  My husband held strong to his belief and there was nothing that could convince him otherwise… unless… I actually did end our relationship because he would not consider my wishes.

    Every time I threatened my husband or promised a negative consequence for his anger and/or refusal to change negative behaviors… I remained by his side.  By not following through with my words or actions, my husband lost respect for me.  The more I swore I would respond to his anger (and failed to do so), the worse his anger grew and the more he treated my words as the empty threats of a weak woman.  By warning my husband that his behavior was not going to be tolerated “one more time,” I gave him permission to do it one more time. The only way I ever would have maintained the respect my husband initially had for me, would have been if I walked out on him or kicked him out the very first time he came at me with hostile anger.  Could I have given him a second chance at that point?  Sure.  This may have prevented him for doing it again and solved the problem right away; I will never know.

    I like to tell myself that this would not have worked (because it makes me feel better).  I tell myself that I was not dealing with a man who knew how to handle confrontation of any kind without aggressive anger, so I had to get to this place in order to understand how to prevent it from occurring again.  Regardless of what I tell myself now, I should have followed through on my words the first time if I wanted to be respected by him and feel respect for myself.

    I have no doubt that you have also gone against your word and remained by your husband’s side despite swearing his most recent angry outburst would be the last.  I have good news… you can still regain respect for yourself and have your husband respect you by choosing to be a consistent woman today and to never again make a threat or promise you do not intend to keep.  How do you do this?  You learn how to stop your husband in his tracks so that anger is no longer accepted by you… not even one more time.

    Does that mean you have to leave him the next time he defies you?  No.

    In retrospect, I know that if I had actually divorced John because of his defiance to stop using anger as a means to communicate, I would have given him NO CHOICE but to submit to my demand.  If his defiance NO LONGER WORKED and threatened the very thing he wanted to avoid, he would have had to either chose a future without me, or change his behavior.  My husband has always loved me.  My husband has always wanted to make our relationship work.  Because I know this, I believe that if I had left him and told him the only way I would take him back, would be if he read 100 articles and then talked to me about them, in depth (so I knew for certain he read them), he would have done it.  I believe he still would have pushed my threats as far as he could go, and he would have required my follow-through to “end everything” before he did it… but in my heart I think he would have ultimately done it.

    It would have required my husband having ZERO alternative to changing his behavior for him to finally relinquish it in favor of saving the relationship he really wanted.

    It would have had to come to that.

    I know now that reading 100,000 articles wouldn’t have made my husband change his use of anger in our relationship, but I didn’t back then.  I rolled the dice on not following through on any threats I made and our relationship suffered as a result.  I always believed there was another way to reach him and being as defiant as my Aspie husband is… I wanted to prove myself right.  As it turns out (thankfully), there is a far better way to stop your husband’s anger (that does not involve threats), but this doesn’t mean it is an “easier” way.

     

    I KNOW YOU ARE NOW FEELING READY TO BEGIN MAKING PERSONAL CHANGES TO PREVENT HIS ANGER IN THE FUTURE…

    NOT SO FAST…

    I AM NOT CERTAIN YOU FULLY GRASP HOW DIFFICULT CHANGE IS QUITE YET

    Before I share the simple method you can use to begin teaching your husband to change his anger… I need to really drive home the point (as I enjoy doing) that this is NOT going to go smoothly.  As it stands, you have taught your Angry-Aspie husband that he does not need to change.  You have taught him that if he fights long enough… that if he is willing to go the distance to be proven right… that if there stands a remote chance that he could avoid a confrontation, get attention, gain satisfaction, make you go away, or ultimately… obtain CONTROL

    then it is worth the battle each and every time.

    You have taught your husband that his defiance WORKS… even if it is only effective 1 out of 10 times. You have taught your husband that he stands the chance to win, even if the odds are stacked heavily against him.  For a strong-willed and hardened fighter like your Aspie husband… those odds are going to continue to be worth his efforts and any negative consequence his efforts yield in your relationship.

     

    BACK TO THE PIECE OF SHIT LAWNMOWER

    Go ahead and try to tell your mechanically-gifted Aspie husband that his old lawnmower that only works 1 out of every 10 times he tries to cut the grass is “no good and he should consider buying a newer, more effective one.”  Go ahead and tell him that the poorly-cut lawn his machine manages to leave in its wake, the potential for eviction you both face if you are cited for an unacceptable home-appearance in your neighborhood one more time, or all the lost time between you both (that he spends trying to make it work) … go ahead and tell him why these reasons justify dumping that old piece of shit grass-chewer.

    And then go ahead and watch him throw his middle finger up at you in return.

    Watch him as he spends hours using an old mower to cut the lawn when a new one could get the job done in a fraction of the time, with a fraction of the energy, and with far more effective results.  Watch him as he defies your suggestion with unreasonably hostile anger.  Watch him as he loses weight in the blistering sun trying to prove the effectiveness and worthiness of his equipment.  Watch him as he wastes an entire day fixing it when he could have spent it enjoying the afternoon with his wife instead.  Watch him as he endures any negative consequence and sucks up countless hours of frustrated energy, to power through with his terribly defective machine.  Stand back in astonishment as he spends five times more money to fix his hunk of junk than it would have cost to purchase the best lawnmower on the market.

    WHAT AN IDIOT!

    Your Aspie husband believes his lawnmower is fully functional and has purpose. So long as his it serves its purpose every once in a while, it will be kept.  It has worked for him in the past and he believes with all of his stubborn might… that it will continue working in the future.  He will stop at nothing to prove himself right (not you wrong… but himself right).

    You may initially wonder why you are fighting with him over a lawnmower in the first place and willingly allow him to waste his day and energy on it if that’s what he chooses.  That is how you will respond until his “lawnmower efforts” begin to ruin your plans, mood, sense of security, and overall happiness because you never spend quality time together.  When your husband begins to ignore everything else in your marriage to “use his lawnmower” instead… it is going to really frickin matter to you at that point.

    You are going to try to buy a new “better” mower and put it in his direct line of sight so he opts to use that one the next time he cuts the grass.  When he ignores you, you are going to demand he use the new one.  When he ignores you, you are going to demand he stop using the old one.  When he ignores you, you are going to threaten to destroy or throw out the old one.  When he threatens you back and becomes more hostile, you are going to find yourself becoming angry, resentful, and hostile in return.

    You might even begin to beg him to stop using the old mower, plead with him to consider your feelings, or try to rationalize how a new mower could improve your time together.  When he ignores you, you are going to break down in tears and feel like he doesn’t even love you enough to change out an old stupid lawnmower that is causing completely unnecessary misery… even though there is a perfectly beneficial one right in front of his selfish eyes!  When you cry over it, he is going to tell you that you are being ridiculous.

    You may find yourself bouncing between a million different ways to get through to him, day after day, only to find that your husband has not ever stopped to even consider dumping his old mower or bothered to look at the new one… not even once.

    He hasn’t considered it because as far as he is concerned…

    the old one works, case closed.

    You can go toe to toe with this kind of Aspie defiance all day long but in the end, you will be left with exhaustion and a desire to just submit to his will and hope for a better tomorrow.  When you finally submit and he manages to get the lawn cut with his defective yard tool, he will consider his fight a victory.  That is how the Aspie husband solidifies the idea that his battle was a worthy one.  He will go on using his busted up shit-mower again next week, regardless of the negative impact it has on you.

    This is what you have been doing, and you can keep doing this… if you want the same outcome. Or… you can walk into the garage, gut the entire engine of the lawnmower and throw it away where he can never again find the parts (because guess what? The parts needed to build that machine long ago… they are no longer in existence to rebuild it again in the future!) and place a sign on the shell that remains that reads: BROKEN!

    Your husband is going to be really pissed off at you and he is going to rage on you.  Is that really going to matter when the end result is that he has to come to terms with the fact that his lawnmower is NEVER AGAIN GOING TO WORK and it can never again cut a single blade of grass for the remainder of eternity?

    Provided you make sure he can never figure out a way to make that stupid machine fire up again, EVEN ONE MORE TIME, he is going to have to let it go.  Once he accepts that his beloved lawnmower stands ZERO CHANCE of ever again working for him…

    HE IS GOING TO HAVE TO CHANGE IS METHOD OF CUTTING THE LAWN.

    He isn’t going to want to use that brand new super-mower that you purchased him because he is going to be angry at you.  Eventually though… when he comes to terms with the fact that he has to cut the lawn if he wants to remain in his home and have any quality time with his wife, he is going to give that new mower a second glance and consider using it.  He is going to rationalize why it is worth it to “give it a try” and he’s GOING TO USE IT.

     AFTER SEEING THE AMAZING RESULTS AND MINIMAL EFFORT IT TAKES TO ACHIEVE THEM,

     HE IS GOING TO CONTINUE TO USE IT…

     BECAUSE IT WORKS!

    You are not the lawnmower.  Your husband’s angry behavior is.  His anger has worked for him, albeit only a percent of the times he has used it, but it has still worked enough times to consider it functional.  Until you make it unarguably clear that his anger will NEVER AGAIN WORK FOR HIM to achieve a single positive or desired result…

    He will always default to it.

    It’s time for you to replace his old mower with a brand new (effective) one.

    I promise you, there is ZERO chance your husband will EVER change his current behaviors and learn to use more effective and positive ones until you make it clear to him that he has NO OTHER OPTION. It does not matter how angry, hostile, defensive, pathetic, dismissive, defiant, argumentative, lazy, or indifferent his behavior may be; he will not change it if it CONTINUES TO YIELD DESIRED RESULTS.  He has to comprehend that his anger is no longer working and will never again work as a means of control in your marriage.  Once he has expended every amount of defiant energy imaginable to deny that he is losing this battle, that his fight is a futile one because he cannot win and faces ultimate demise if he continues trying, that his method of obtaining control is a BROKEN METHOD…

    At that time your husband will be ready to make the changes necessary to replace his angry responses and approaches with more effective and positive ones. 

     MY HUSBAND TOLD ME WHAT TO DO, I JUST WASN’T LISTENING

    John told me what was happening this month as we sat on the floor of my closet in the dark.  He told me that we were failing, and we were failing because of his ignorance about how to respond appropriately to me (without anger).  He told me that we were failing because he was defaulting to anger as a method of control because he deemed it the easiest path to take… because it was familiar to him.

    It isn’t easier to get angry in response to feelings and emotions he does not comprehend, but he could not see that at the time.  It isn’t easier because in the long run, his anger puts up a wall to communicating with his wife.  In the long run, his anger leads to a wife who is angry, sad, hurt, afraid, exhausted, defeated, and ready to give up on the marriage.  In the long run, his anger has led to all of these feelings for himself as well.  In the long run, his anger has prevented the happiness both he and his wife could have been sharing for years… had he learned to change his use of it.

    When push came to shove, what John had convinced himself to be the easier path to trudge…

    had made his life (and his wife’s) pure hell.

    My husband was not alone.

     

    WHY PEOPLE DON’T CHANGE FOR THE BETTER

    People choose to take the road they think is easier (because it is what they are acclimated to) all the time.  If our society did not do this, everyone would be wealthy, highly educated, and the advancements made in our communities each day would be mind-blowing.

     People get by with “just enough” to keep telling themselves it is easier than trying to accomplish what they are actually capable of in their lives.

    Consider a woman who graduates high school with grand intentions of going to college and obtaining her degree and license as a physical therapist.  While she is in between high school and her wishful future, she stumbles on a fantastic opportunity to work as a clerk in one of the city’s top Sports Medicine Clinics, and the pay is impressive for a high school graduate to come upon.

    You might think this young lady is on the path to success and has the capacity to accomplish the goal of becoming a physical therapist in no time… if she just keeps pushing herself forward.

    Now consider this young lady meets a strikingly handsome and magnetic man who is interning at the clinic and “falls in love.”  Within a year, when she is just about ready to begin the college program she worked hard to get accepted into… she discovers she is pregnant and going to have a child at a young age with her new love.  Suddenly plans shift.  This motivated and determined girl is feeling fearful of the future.  Fear comes from wondering if she is ready to meet the demands of motherhood and the awesome responsibility it will bring.  Fear comes from wondering if she will be able to financially support her child’s needs, pay for college, and afford the larger living space the baby will require.  Suddenly, all of her thoughts will be filled with fear; fear that there will never be a feasible way to manage the time needed to attend college and study, work full time to cover costs, and have enough time with her new infant.  She begins to fear the stability of her new relationship as she and her new love begin arguing about the responsibilities their new discovery will entail of them both.  Fear is overriding every other emotion this young woman had a month ago… when she did not know she was pregnant.

    This woman is very religious and her religion does not allow for abortion to be considered.  This woman comes from a family that values children and is culturally against adoption.  This woman is firm in her childhood upbringing and the values it has instilled in her and she will not waver from them, not even long enough to consider an alternate option to having and raising her child.  This woman begins to break down and her stress ultimately becomes an intolerable and undesired weight on her new love.  Since he can “make a clean break” and not look back; the relationship was pretty new anyway and he has BIG PLANS that cannot be sidelined for a woman he wasn’t even certain he wanted to commit to…. he makes the choice to run… and he runs fast.

    Now this young lady is faced with emotions so intense she has a hard time making sense of them.  She decides to sideline her aspirations of attending college with the plan to return to it once she is “more stable.”

    Fast forward a decade and this woman, still a single parent, still working at the same clinic, considers a return to her initial dream of becoming a physical therapist; which has remained in the back of her mind all those years.  She feels like a failure and she feels like life is passing her by, so she wants to make a move before it is too late.  She can do it.  She can feel the fear and step through it and accomplish the life she knows is possible.

    She doesn’t.

    She doesn’t do it because the same fear that caused her to submit to taking the “easier road” a decade earlier still becomes the identified easier path this time around; the others lead to an unknown journey that carries unknown results.  The sad thing is, the easier path she is choosing is one that will definitely cause her to feel resentful or like a personal failure.  The easier path could never be the path that will always end with negative emotions that cause her harm, but she is blinded by fear.  Even though the decision to pursue school might be a challenge to undertake initially (as all major changes are), in the end it would likely bring less financial worry, less concern about her future stability and that of her young child, more possibility of finding a desirability relationship, less self-criticism, more pride in her accomplishments, and far more opportunities to uncover that may open new doors and paths she never thought possible.

    All she had to do was desire a change, abandon the old belief systems that paralyzed her life, and take a deep breath as she stepped forward into the unknown with an optimistic drive to succeed against all odds placed before her.  All she had to do was believe that a better life could be realized if she took the steps toward it.

    Do you think most people leap at the opportunity to change their lives for the better?

    No, of course they don’t or we would be living on a much happier planet.  People stay in the same spot even when it is making them miserable or it makes their life more challenging than it needs to be.  People thwart change and remain in unwanted relationships, careers, families, social circles, and environments, and they do it only because they are “used to it” and it has “gotten them by” until that time.

    For most people, that’s enough to not risk changing their life.

     DO YOU REALLY THINK HE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT CHANGED?

    So where do you and your Aspie husband fit into this theory of change?  Well, for one thing you have likely read to this point with a feeling of motivation to tell your husband that his angry behavior is no longer going to be accepted as a behavior that “works” in your marriage, right?  You believe that if he were to change this one chronic emotion, your lives could change for the better.  You are probably even struggling to comprehend how he cannot see that he is enduring so much pain and negativity and there is a simple solution to changing it all.  It is probably very difficult to understand why he would be willing to risk losing 9 out of 10 times (by utilizing anger) when he could turn that into a 90-100% success rate instead.  This doesn’t seem so hard to grasp, right?  So why can’t he see this?

    I DON’T KNOW…

    MAYBE FOR THE SAME REASON YOU CANNOT SEE YOU ARE DOING THE SAME THING AND PLAYING THE SAME TERRIBLE ODDS?!?!?

    You and your husband were happy together once.  You were happy or you never would have opted to move forward in the relationship.  The time for him to develop a sense of security in his “bare minimum” efforts would never have been afforded to him.  You identified early on that you did not like being treated like a doormat, right?  You knew pretty quick your husband was treating you with disrespect and you did not like the way it felt.  You told yourself that “Something has GOT TO CHANGE” or your life was going to remain miserable… or get worse.

     But nothing changed because you weren’t willing to make the same change you have been expecting your husband to make…

    to abandon an old behavior that DOES NOT WORK!

    You have 90-100% odds of improving your relationship, or at least your own feelings of self-worth if you immediately choose to STOP your husband’s ability to treat you like a doormat ever again.  You have a 0-10% chance at finding happiness if you DO NOT CHANGE your own behavior.

    Why are you still trying to rationalize odds so stacked against you?

    Is it because you have become equally complacent in your effort?  Are you afraid of the changes that are absolutely going to occur (one way or another) when you finally do draw an unsurpassable line in the sand?  Are you afraid of the immediate changes you will be forced to make the moment you make it clear to your husband that his anger will NEVER AGAIN be accepted as a means of control in your marriage?

    You are getting 0-10% of the love you deserve and only 0-10% of the love your husband has to offer. Why are you still asking yourself if that 0-10% is a high enough return on your investment to stick around when you could be getting 90-100% instead?

    It’s what you are used to… isn’t it?

    You have “gotten by” with less than 10% all this time, haven’t you?

    It’s ok, you can admit it. 

    When the final ruling of “who needs to change in your marriage” is handed down,

    you are going to get a unanimous verdict.

    YOU BOTH DO!

     

    Suck it up buttercup.  You are no different from your Aspie husband.  Your behaviors may be different, and your comprehension of “what” needs to change may be more readily identifiable to you than it is to him; but long ago the two of you equally chose to cement your feet into a foundation of disappointment and resentment all because you were both afraid of change.  That fear of change has sent both of you into a desperate fight for power and control that neither of you could ever win.

     

    STOP BEING SUCH A CHICKENSHIT

    You do not need to be afraid of change.  You do not need to fear this, because you already know your husband CAN CHANGE his behavior.  You know this because HE HAS CHANGED ALREADY (and so have you).  He wasn’t the man that stands before today you when you first fell in love.  He was a better version of himself, a complete image of what he is capable of being AGAIN in the future (if not way more).

    If he changed once to become the angry man you currently share a bed with…

    he can change back to the man you couldn’t wait to share a bed with!

    Your Aspie husband is not mentally ill.  Your Aspie husband does not have a brain injury.  Your Aspie husband does not have a personality disorder.  Your Aspie husband does not have a physical ailment preventing him from changing back to the man you fell in love with.

    Yeah, you finally comprehend something you didn’t know back when all those awful changes were beginning to occur… you know a little something about cognitive empathy.  You know that your Aspie husband cannot read nonverbal messages.  Do you understand fully that that is the ONLY thing he cannot do?

    Guess what?  You don’t need your husband to comprehend nonverbal messages to be happy together because YOU are more than capable of using verbal words to clearly express what you are thinking, feeling, and desiring from him; you are equally competent enough to make sense of the verbal words he is saying to you.  Guess what else?  Your Aspie husband did not have cognitive empathy when you met him either.  Your Aspie husband couldn’t read your nonverbal messages back then any more than he can today, but that did not prevent you from falling deeply in love with him enough to become his wife, did it?  You fell in love with that man so much that THAT MAN is who you want him to transform back into.

    Asperger’s syndrome did not cause your marital difficulties,

    defaulting back to his previously learned behaviors and resistance to change did. 

    Your husband was the same Aspie the day you fell in love with him that he is today,

    he just needs your help to let those broken defenses go.

    GOT IT… SO NOW WHAT?

    So what are you going to do?  Are you going to put your damn foot down and tell your husband that the angry behaviors he used in the past that “worked for him” are no longer an option?  Are you going to tell him his old method is BROKEN and will never again function to control you in any regard?  Are you going to tell your husband that it is time for CHANGE or he is no longer going to have a wife to change for?  Are you going to admit that it is time for you to begin changing what you will and will not allow to occur in your marriage from this day forward?  Are you going to stop blaming Asperger’s syndrome for his anger and stop allowing his anger to define your daily existence?  Are you going to stop letting him control your emotions and start regaining the power you both should have to live fulfilling and happy lives?  Are you going to stop considering that you are in ANY WAY responsible for causing your husband’s anger, you are only responsible for allowing it to continue?

    You didn’t cause your husband’s anger any more than he caused your response to it.  Your husband’s anger-response was learned many years before he ever met you.  His anger is a default reaction to fear of pain; it is a default attempt to gain control in situations where he feels powerless. It worked for him in his youth, it worked for him as an adult, and it works for him with you in your marriage. You must completely comprehend why he has anger, why he uses anger, and that his anger is a modifiable behavior before you will be ready to do anything about his anger.  You must be ready and willing to never again allow it to work for him to gain control and truly understand that if you allow it to work, even 1% of the time, you are allowing him to continue using it 100% of the time.

     

    IT’S ON YOU NOW.

     WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO?

     

     

     

    Look for the pending post: WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP THE ANGER?


  • HOW TO HANDLE AN ASPIE HUSBAND’S UNWANTED BEHAVIOR LIKE A BOSS

    Literally… like a boss… or a parent… or just a positive human being who interacts with other human beings 

     

    This is intended for challenging and difficult behaviors you encounter with your Aspie husband.  This post does not specifically address a husband who utilizes hostile anger as a predominate means to communicate in your marriage. Before you can effectively use PP to guide loving communication in your relationship, you will need to tackle the serious roadblock of anger first.  Guidance on that can be found in the following posts:  WHY IS HE SO ANGRY? & WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP THE ANGER?

     

     

    Positive Parenting goes hand in hand with being a positive leader.  Human beings are inherently good by nature (with some exceptions). People want to be good, they want to have their good acknowledged, and they want to strive to be better.  That is the instinctive part of who we are.  This goes wrong when that middle part is absent in an interpersonal relationship.  If a child, spouse, employee, family member, or friend wants to be good and attempts to be good… but no one acknowledges this good… or worse, they discount it and request “more” or “better” effort at being good… that person will no longer strive to be better.  Often, they will stop wanting to be good at all.

    IF YOU WISH YOUR MERIT TO BE KNOWN, ACKNOWLEDGE THAT OF OTHER PEOPLE. 

    -Unknown

    This is common sense that unfortunately… is not common.  Countless people get this all fudged up and think that being an effective parent or leader requires stern direction, rigid authority, micromanagement, and the implementation of harsh consequences. Countless parents and leaders find the “bad” in a scenario and focus in on that at the exclusion of what was going “good” before the unwanted behavior was identified.  They use examples of their identified “bad or wrong” behavior to request further efforts for improvement without ever stopping to acknowledge the current efforts, previous successes, or existing improvements a child or employee has made in the first place.

    The very goal set forth, to encourage a child or employee to be the “best they can be” ends up being sabotaged by the misguided efforts the parent or boss is applying to “make” it to happen.

    I read a book when I was first becoming a mother about being a “Positive Parent” (PP).  I opted to use this technique throughout my daughter’s formative years (from age 0-10) and I found nothing but success from the PP method.  Around the time my daughter was 6-years old, I went to a sales school for the military (the same one top companies send their salespersons through) that taught me about the basic skills of being a successful salesperson.  This method was very similar to the positive parenting skills I had been utilizing, so it was easy for me to implement it into how I communicated with potential military applicants.  I became a very successful saleswoman, selling lives to people each day (I recruited for prior-service adults to return to military service, not high school or individuals with no previous military service).

    When my daughter was 8-years old, I went for further training on “coaching” employees to help enable me to become a better leader.  This was the same training Fortune 500 Companies send their managers through to learn how to become effective leaders in upper management.  The skills taught there mirrored those of being a positive parent as well, so this was also easy for me to implement into my career.  I became an incredibly effective and positive leader and mentor.  I actually do not like the term “boss” (despite the title of this post) because I think it is is indicative of being a dictator, which thankfully, I learned to never become.

    While I have yet to fully consider the implementation of these lessons a “success” in my marriage, they have helped in moving toward more open dialog between us and improved behavior overall.  They continue to work with 100% effectiveness in all other aspects of my personal and professional life, provided I always stick to the basics.

    After my daughter turned 10, I became overwhelmed with the demands of my own personal life from grief, stress in my new relationship, finances, balancing work and education, and fear of the future in general.  Without purposeful intention, I stopped utilizing the basics of PP on a daily basis.  I effectively became a “lazy parent” and dismissed the basic PP tools in favor of just existing from day to day without any additional thought given to the most important job, role, or gift I have ever had.  By not having to put forth the effort in overseeing my role as a good mother, role model, and teacher for my daughter, I was unintentionally rolling the dice with her future.  Fortunate for me, my daughter had already learned to strive to be “good” from my previous efforts of PP and was a compassionate and well-behaved child in general.  While I lost a ton of valuable time helping her become “the best she could be” and teaching her how to behave with more responsibility and increasing efforts at home and in school, I did (almost ironically) continue to use the basics of PP in my professional life; whereby I was always met with 100% effectiveness with those who served under my leadership.

    I am sharing this with all of you because this “positive parenting” method is exactly what NT wives need to utilize with their spouses to create a mutually beneficial relationship.  This will work for NT parents to help enable their Aspie children to become “the best they can be” as well.  These PP methods are exactly what our Aspie husbands need to learn to do with us, and as fathers, to become effective spouses and parents so that they too, can be graced with the peace found in the resulting mutually beneficial relationships these basic principles have to offer.

    I do not think that the original book I purchased and utilized on being a positive parent (through my daughter’s formative years) broke down the basics the same way I recently uncovered in a quick internet search on the topic.  I really appreciate the further simplicity of how this PP method has been laid out (here), so I am going to use the LOVE/CARE acronym from this website to bring the information to all of you:

     

    L-O-V-E

     

    L – Look for the reason behind the behavior. Stop and consider what is “behind” the child/employee/spouse’s actions.  This is the most crucial step in identifying an effective method to moving forward.  In sales, we call this identifying the “need behind the need.”  Is the person tired, jealous, needing instruction or direction, afraid, or has a misunderstanding occurred?

     

    O – Open your heart.  After identifying the underlying reason behind a behavior, remember that if you do not like a person’s actions, you still like the person.  Rather than reacting to a behavior, make a conscious choice to step back, reflect, and just breathe for a moment!  Open your heart, allow compassion to override your instinctive desire to respond with emotion, and choose to approach the behavior with love first (and always).

     

    V – Validate feelings.  Regardless of why a person (child, husband, etc.) is expressing feelings that you may deem inappropriate or wrong, their feeling (in and of itself) is not ever “wrong.”  Let the person know that you are understanding how they are feeling… use your God-given gift at being an exceptionally empathetic neurotypical to give them empathy first for their feelings.

    Here is an example of how the L-O-V could play out in a family dynamic:

    Let’s say you are having a family dinner and your husband (or child) abruptly bangs their drinking glass on the table and stomps off into their bedroom and slams the door shut.  Your instinct is to yell at them to stop behaving that way and feel frustrated or angry that they just ruined the family meal and caused an inappropriate scene. This is where you enact the L.  Look at why this just occurred. What happened leading up to that moment?  What was said that may have been misinterpreted, what happened that may have caused distress in the person leading up to their action? Open your heart up and take pause before reacting.  Consider what transpired to cause their feelings and subsequent “unwanted” behavior, and then put yourself in their shoes without the perception you personally have about the circumstances surrounding it.  After finding the calm to do this, give your husband or child validation for their feelings (not their behavior) and say, “I can understand how that would make you feel (insert emotion).”  Let the person know that you are not against their feeling.  Once this happens, you are ready to move on to the final letter in utilizing LOVE to correct unwanted behaviors in the future.

     

    E –Explore solutions. After you have approached the unwanted behavior with a calm and accepting level of attention and then validated the person’s feelings; it is time to focus on a solution.  Ultimately, it is about teaching the person “appropriate” ways of behaving that have an effective and positive outcome instead of punishing a behavior and increasing the likelihood it will reoccur!  Get the person (child, spouse, employee, etc.) involved in the process of making it right.

    This method of identifying a mutually beneficial solution engages feelings of being validated, respected, and valued; more times than not… this will lead to an immediate union of effort between the two parties to reach a common goal.  This is about problem-solving TOGETHER.  Mutual problem resolution teaches responsibility for personal actions and gives the person an incredibly invaluable tool to utilize throughout their life.

    The first three letters, L-O-V, are often easy to implement with an Aspie husband, and regardless of his ability to tell you he appreciates you doing this, he will.  The last letter… that stinkin’ E… well this one takes a lot of time and a great deal of patience from the NT to get to.

    The majority of Aspie husbands (certainly any Aspie husband who has a spouse reading this website) lacks the ability to respond to the “E” part of the acronym appropriately.  These men were never taught to problem solve after having their feelings acknowledged and validated by their loved one’s, authority figures, or peers throughout their life. They were not taught this because they rarely ever had their feelings acknowledged at all.  Because of this, they haven’t a clue what the exploration of solutions with another person even entails.  They are acclimated to having another person “tell them” what they are doing or have done wrong, and then “tell them” how they need to alter their behavior in the future.

    It would be an incredible fluke to find an Aspie husband who was ever afforded the opportunity to problem solve with someone else in order to reach a positive outcome. This missing (and important) experience in an Aspie’s life is what sets the stage for trying to control an outcome with demands or personal opinions of what the solution should be. This absent experience also sets the stage for Aspie husbands to have an instinctual desire to dismiss anyone else’s personal input or perceive their thoughts to be “unfair demands” meant to gain control over them (enter hostile defiance).

    NT wives need to keep requesting their husband’s personal thoughts on an event that led to unwanted behavior.  They need to continue offering their thoughts on potential solutions to prevent this behavior from reoccurring.  They need to do this calmly and repetitively, until they can break down the barriers that currently exist.

    Sometimes it will take listening to your Aspie husband without offering a return response; listen as they loudly and/or aggressively proclaim their opinion on the necessary resolutions (while ignoring yours).  Write them down. Walk away from the discussion (that was likely one-sided) when you first start implementing the LOVE method into your life.  After writing down your husband’s thoughts on the situation, write down your own and include a few optional solutions that may benefit the whole. Once you have this on paper, share it with your Aspie husband (and walk away from him as he reads it).  This is likely to be a resolution attempt that can span several days before your husband even reads what you wrote, or becomes aware that his feelings and desires have been heard, validated, and taken into consideration.

    When this knowledge finally breaches the defiant walls that have been built as a defense-mechanism throughout your husband’s life, the stage will be set for positive behavior modification.  It may take a long time to get to this place of breaching his defenses and you may believe he is disinterested in even reading what you wrote or ever considering a mutual discussion of it… but I assure you… the time will come if you continue to approach him with the LOVE methodology.  Eventually, you may move closer to a time when you can begin exploring some of mutually beneficial solutions together without having to wait days or weeks in between the L-O-V, and the E.

    This is not easy, but this absolutely WORKS if an NT wife is committed to seeing it through!  If there is any doubt it works, use it with NT children, friends, family, and business relationships in the future and the success rate will (without any doubt) prove how effective it is to building positive relationships and effective conflict-resolution.

    My husband will not appreciate what I am about to say, but… this LOVE technique works 99.9% of the time with young children and your husband because… well, he has an equivalent comprehension of conflict resolution (despite his age) as a child would.  He never learned to do this as a child.  If you can accept this as true, you can trust in attempting it in your marriage.

     

    WHAT’S NEXT?   

    The next acronym to be used in being a positive parent, spouse, friend, or leader is CARE.  In most situations, CARE can be implemented immediately after LOVE, if the “exploration of solutions” does not bring about the desired behavior changes. This is a tried and true means of behavior modification for the betterment of all involved parties.  Again, when dealing with an Aspie husband, this next step will take a significantly longer duration of time to implement before you will deem it “effective” in managing behavior-related conflict in your Aspie-NT marriage.

     

    C-A-R-E

    C –Consequences.  When problem-solving is not enough, it is appropriate to begin considering logical consequences.  Consequences should only be used with the intention of being a positive teacher for the other person.  Consequences should never (NEVER) be used with the intention of getting even, or hurting another person.

    Consequences should be directly related to the behavior… always.  For example, if a child throws their toy at another child, it is logical to take that toy away for a period of time (the example used on the website).  It is not logical (or appropriate) to throw that toy at your child (so they know what it feels like), or to destroy that toy in front of them as a consequence for their behavior.  Responding to behavior like that teaches them that “getting even” or hurting someone (as a response to an unwanted action) is justified.  No consequence like that will ever appropriately address the behavior that you seek to modify.

    If your employee is chronically socializing with other employees in lieu of getting their job done, it is logical to dock their pay for the time they are essentially “on break” or require them to stay beyond their working hours (for the time they allotted for socializing) without additional pay.  It is punitive to extend their working hours in excess, or change their environment to a location with which they haven’t anyone to socialize.  It is punitive to threaten their employment or increase their workload beyond the original scope of their job.  It is punitive to embarrass them in front of others by calling out their unwanted behavior, or criticize the work they are doing, or micromanage them.  (Yes, as an employer sometimes punitive action like terminating a person’s employment is indeed, necessary!)

    If your teenager is constantly leaving dirty dishes in the sink, it is appropriate to have them do the dishes before they can have their electronic devices for the day, this is a logical consequence.  It would be hurtful to leave those dirty dishes in their bed and it would be hurtful to demand they wash everyone’s dishes from then on out as a punishment.

    If your husband habitually fails to acknowledge your birthday, it would be logical (after implementing the LOVE acronym) to arrange a birthday celebration on your own or request that your special day be celebrated on another day.  It would be hurtful to purposely disregard your husband’s birthday that year to “get even” and it would be punishment to spend the day sulking or telling him how awful he was to forget or disregard your birthday.

    Consequences for unwanted behavior have to appropriately address the behavior itself and be utilized with the intention of teaching in a positive way so that the behavior does not continue.

    A – Act with fairness.  The goal is to teach the person how to do better next time!  You cannot create a consequence by imposing unrelated or unequal “punishments” for the behavior.  When a person responds to an unwanted behavior with an unfair consequence, they only set the stage for building resentment and diminish the chance of ever improving that specific behavior.

    If your teenage daughter is always forgetting to take their dog outside, it is illogical to take away their iPad for a week as a punishment.  It is cruel to stop taking the dog out yourself (to the animal) and then demand the teenager not only clean the excrement itself, but the entire floors of the house once the dog has relieved themselves indoors.  It would be hurtful to get rid of the dog.

    In the examples I gave under Consequences, you can hopefully identify what would be deemed fair, vice those responses that are meant to cause hurt and will ultimately create resentment.

    It is very difficult to respond to unwanted behaviors with a calm and fair consequence, so it is essential that you remove yourself from the situation for a period of time to ensure this occurs.  It helps to step outside the box and return to the LOVE acronym in your mind before settling on an appropriate consequence, as this will enable you to identify one that is based off of being fair and addresses the actual behavior.

    Once again, the entire point of consequences is to teach with a positive outcome, not to punish or create a worsening repetition of the behavior.

     

    R –Reconnect. This is so important.  This is absolutely one of the most important steps in the LOVE/CARE process that solidifies it as a positive one.  For a child, this includes lots of hugs and kisses to let the child know that their unwanted behavior has not caused the parent to lessen the amount of love they have for them.  For a teenager, this may include a hug, or sentiments of appreciation for their maturity in discussing their behavior and working toward a mutually beneficial solution, or it may be a hug or sentiment of appreciation for their acceptance of the consequence for their actions.  For an employee, this may come from the same sentiments of appreciation (hugs are usually not appropriate in the workplace, so don’t do this!), or it could come in the form of acknowledging their efforts to correct a behavior or your appreciation for their professionalism in taking accountability for their actions.

    For an Aspie husband, this comes in the form of giving all of the above (as appropriate for your husband).  This may be saying “thank you” the next time they consciously stop an unwanted behavior from occurring, it may come from telling them how much you appreciate their act of consideration for your feelings and how it makes you “feel” very happy inside.

    You cannot use a nonverbal method of expressing your pleasure in their intentional act to correct an unwanted behavior, because they will not see it.  For instance, if your husband begins to throw the old coffee grounds in the garbage instead of the sink (lol, my example) you cannot just smile the next time you see him do this and assume he is aware of your happiness toward his actions.  You cannot say something like, “It’s so cool that the walls aren’t covered in coffee grounds anymore” either!  Even though that may appear to sound like a comment showing appreciation for efforts, suggestive statements like that often get misinterpreted as insults or purposely re-hashing his historical screw ups along the way.  You have to be direct, you have to be clear, and you have to openly verbalize that you are happy with his actions by using words like, “Thank you so much for putting the coffee grounds in the garbage can, that makes me feel happy inside and I appreciate it very much.”  Can you see the difference?

    Ultimately, if you choose to reconnect with your husband after he has faced the consequences for his behavior like a mature partner, it is important that you verbalize your appreciation of it.

    A PERSON WHO FEELS APPRECIATED WILL ALWAYS DO MORE THAN EXPECTED

     

    When my husband responds to something I requested, or changes a habit or action that once upset me, I like to add in an unwanted hug (by force because I am an asshole) while directly stating how much his efforts have made me feel happy inside.  My husband usually tells me I am “being obnoxious” and to not “state the obvious” or even bring it up again (because then he “won’t want to do it to avoid my mushy and annoying responses”) but I know he needs and enjoys having his actions acknowledged by me.  If I do not acknowledge an attempt he has made at correcting something he was once “bitched at” for, he will always end up telling me that I “never see or acknowledge anything he ever does” the next time we get into an argument over something.

    Never allow a fair and appropriate consequence to linger until it is accomplished. 

    Do not withhold your affection or normal positive behavior “until” the person proves they have taken action to correct something they previously responded to poorly.

    This is an awful mistake we make as parents, “bosses”, friends, family members, and especially… as NT wives.  Once the consequence has been stated or delivered, carry on as you would have prior to the event or behavior.  You HAVE TO DO THIS!  If you do not, there is a high likelihood the behavior will be repeated and they will have a lingering thought that, “This person is already pissed at me and not going to like me, so what’s the point?”

     

    TRACKING?

     

    E – Enjoy. After the LOVE acronym has been mutually accomplished… MOVE ON!

    If you had to impose a fair consequence for a behavior, it is time to move past it and forget it ever happened.  Reconnect with the person and then enjoy the relationship (working or personal) from then on out.  Do not EVER bring the incident back up again, do not EVER nag or bitch about it, do not EVER suggest that the person will knowingly display future unwanted behaviors based off of that particular one.

    Unwanted behavior patterns only happen because we choose to consider them patterns.  If every incident is identified and addressed as a separate and isolated occurrence, the opportunity to dwell on it as a “pattern” ceases to exist.  Telling someone (child, employee, or spouse) they have a “pattern” of negative behavior sends the message that you are defining their entire character as negative and discounting all that is good about them.

    Yes, there are “patterns” and yes, they should be mentally noted in your brain so that you can address their existence appropriately, but they should not be verbalized to the person… ever!  It is important to recognize a child’s pattern of unwanted or negative behavior because it will help to identify potential causes for it that may be missed if observed as a single incident.  Looking from outside the box can help you see positive ways to resolve these things in the future.  For instance, if your child is always throwing toys when you go to a friend’s house, it may not be a specific interaction that caused them to do this, it may be that the other child they encounter always initiates play by limiting access to the toys and refusing to share.  You would still handle each event with the same positive response, but you would not ask your child, “Why are you always bad at XYZ’s house?” and identify a pattern out loud.  You would consider returning to the L in the LOVE acronym and begin looking for what is really going on behind the behavior.

    If your employee is chronically missing deadlines because they are known to be “too social” and spend more time chatting with coworkers than working, you would not say, “You are failing to do your job because socializing has always been more important to you!”   You do not identify a historical pattern because this person will automatically assume their “boss” has always found them to be a failure and assume their “boss” has never acknowledged all of the hard work they have done in their job.  Make sense?  You would identify the isolated incident you intend to correct, and you would move forward.  In your mind, you can acknowledge the pattern and step outside the box to identify what is “really going on” behind the scenes.  Perhaps it is one particular coworker that instigates the problem by telling this employee that “no one in the office likes them and thinks they are weird” and the employee is overcompensating by socializing frequently to gain acceptance from their peers.

    THERE IS ALWAYS A REASON BEHIND A NEGATIVE BEHAVIOR; A NEED BEHIND THE NEED. RECOGNIZING PATTERNS IS IMPORTANT IN UNCOVERING THIS, BUT THERE IS NO REASON TO EVER VERBALIZE THIS TO THE PERSON AND MAKE THEM FEEL “LABELED” BY YOU!

    If your husband is always “forgetting” your birthday, you would not identify the pattern to him and say, “You never remember my birthday, for ten years you have conveniently forgotten something so important to me!”  You would be telling him he is purposely being a jerk and “always” doing something and his will to acknowledge it, identify the cause, or work on a mutually beneficial solution will be effectively destroyed.  If you treat the incident as an isolated one, you give the opportunity to not define his actions as a whole and work on addressing that particular occurrence.  In your mind, it is perfectly fine to recognize the pattern (that’s what we do), and you may begin to uncover reasons that even your husband was unaware of.  Perhaps your birthday falls near a holiday and finances are tight and he unknowingly blocks this additional source of financial stress out to handle the overwhelming stress he already feels.  Perhaps your husband got you a gift you did not like the first year he tried, and he is so fearful of disappointing you again, he has not put himself out there in the last decade to avoid this personal feeling of failure.  If you do not look back on all of the “patterned” behaviors, you may miss the actual cause for his current ones.

    You have to consider patterns of behavior and the root cause, but you should not vocalize this to the person.  The idea is to utilize positive teaching to correct unwanted behaviors, so you cannot ever allow the person (husband, child, employee) to consider that you view their isolated incident as a reflection of them in whole.

    Once an incident is addressed, reconnect and move on.  This helps a child and Aspie husband learn to make amends (something the child will need in their life and something the Aspie husband never learned how to do in their childhood).  Dwelling on the past is not needed and is counterproductive to creating mutually beneficial relationships and positive behavior.  Dwelling on the past diminishes the opportunity for positive behaviors to develop in the future.  Go through the L-O-V-E C-A-R… and then make sure you Enjoy!

    This is a tried and true method of conflict resolution and positive leadership and teaching for any interpersonal dynamic.  It is going to take a lot of repetition and hard work to get it to smoothly solve all of your Aspie-NT marriage challenges, but I promise…

    IT WORKS!


  • ASPERGER’S SYNDROME AND RIGIDITY

    WHY WE SHOULD STOP APPEASING PECULIAR BEHAVIORS AND ROUTINES FOR ASPERGER HUSBAND’S

     

    My Husband’s Rigidity

    Throughout my relationship with John, one thing has always remained constant about him:  he is an intolerably moody and argumentative jerk for approximately two hours after awakening every single day. 

    John’s morning routine:

    1. Wake up
    2. Get dressed
    3. Brush teeth
    4. Make coffee and breakfast
    5. Sit down and eat/drink while occupying brain with visual distraction for 1-2 hours

    For John, the visual distraction has always been to look at his iPad (reading the news, UFC updates, researching cars, etc.) until he feels ready to begin his day.  Recently his visual distraction has included playing video games after he purchased a new XBOX car racing game that he really enjoys.  John was never a big video-game junkie once we moved in with one another (but I suspect he was when he lived alone) so it does not bother me at all when he opts to play them now.

    That morning routine is John’s thing and while it may not seem to be a big deal, sometimes inflexible behaviors like this become the catalyst for terrible fighting within an NT-Aspie union.

    It is incredibly common to find similar routine or patterned behaviors in adults with Asperger’s syndrome and almost every wife can share varying accounts of how one of her husband’s rigid routines causes her irritation or distress at some point in the relationship.  For John, the morning routine was apparent soon after we moved in with one another and also served in identifying he had Asperger’s syndrome long before I knew what it was (after a coworker identified a similar morning ritual for her Aspie child).

    Considering John thinks he “needs” his morning routine to begin his day without mental chaos, or to just wake himself up enough to clear his mind and tackle the remainder of his day, I could be willing to accept this seemingly peculiar behavior and even accommodate his unique desires.  The problem comes from the fact that if anyone else attempts to engage him during that time, or if their actions (outside of anything that has to do with him) are displeasing to his environment during this window of awakening, John responds with over-the-top and unfair behaviors.  For instance, if John is sitting at the table eating and looking at his iPad and I turn something on the television that he does not want to hear, I talk to him about anything that he is disinterested in, B plays music he can hear… or just about anything else that distracts him from his calming AM focus… John is snarky, rude, nasty, condescending, argumentative, demanding, or just plain inappropriate toward us.

    For the most part, B and I had learned to just avoid him until this two-hour time frame had elapsed because if we set him off, the rest of the day would likely fall to shit for the entire family.  If it was as simple as John desiring this time to have a good day, I would be more than happy to accept this as the norm.  It is not that simple though.  Due to his negative responses to those around him during his “Morning Me Time” I can no longer tolerate the expectation he has that we should alter our own behaviors to placate him.  John has a want that he has convinced himself is a need and he will implore whatever negative behaviors he sees fit to satisfy it.  It has now come to a point where he is going to be given no further option to continue his current behaviors and must find a way to remove himself from our vicinity to accomplish his morning rituals, or learn to modify them into something positive that does not cause his family distress in the process.

     

    Oh but… “Aspies have inflexible routines.” 

    Ummm… Yeah, SO WOULD ANYONE if acting like an intolerable jerk got people to cater to them their entire life!

     

    Oh but… “That’s just part of the disorder.” 

    Like HELL it is!  You had a child who was “different” and bewildered parents who did not comprehend WHY.  After years of frustration and not understanding what set their child into an anxiety-provoked temper tantrum, parents unintentionally allowed for these inflexible routines to both develop and flourish!

     

    The altering of my own behavior and wants to pacify John’s routine is unacceptable and it took a long time for me to have the courage to say I will no longer agree to ignore his “temper tantrums” or walk on eggshells every morning for him because I finally realize that doing so provides positive reinforcement for his negative behavior; and that does not help anyone.  The negative behaviors he displays to calm his own mind is not appropriate as a husband, father, or adult and has to change into something that is appropriate and beneficial to the family as a whole.  This is what maturity, compromise, and positive regard for one another requires from all of us; no one can be immune to taking accountability for their own actions if those actions are causing physical or emotional harm to the ones they love.

     

    How Do These Behaviors Begin in the First Place?

    We all come into this world with things that overwhelm us from our youth in regard to our environment.  There are lights, textures, noises, people, animals, places and other things in our daily world that we find upsetting, annoying, irritating, or uncomfortable.  As young children, we are not equipped with the language skills to articulate the things that bother us, so we behave in dramatic ways to express our discomfort like whining, crying, or throwing full-on temper tantrums.  Damn-near every child has similar responses to environmental stimuli that they do not readily enjoy.  Both Aspie and NT children develop in the same manner and can throw equally passionate temper tantrums when they are attempting to express their distress in something they cannot verbalize to the adults around them.  Children with Asperger’s syndrome and those deemed neurotypical do not have opposing thought-processes from birth to around three-years old.  They are children with the exact same cognitive development and it only begins to reach a fork in the road when nonverbal communication heavily outweighs the use of actual words.

    When a young NT child throws a temper tantrum to express their uneasiness with something in their environment, they learn to overcome such triggers based on the expectations of their parents.  For instance, if a neurotypical four-year old were to throw themselves on the floor in the middle of a department store in tears (because the entire process of spending long and boring durations of time in a brightly lit, loud, and incredibly stimulating environment causes them to become overwhelmed) their parent will impose authority to teach them their behavior is inappropriate and will not be tolerated.  Without realizing it, by the age of four, most of the communication coming from that parent is in the form of nonverbal communication.  The parent may make angry facial expressions or body movements for a significant amount of time to tell the child they are getting angry before they eventually say something like, “Knock it off, stop being bad and embarrassing me or you are going to be punished when you get home!”  Both the Aspie and NT child will know from the spoken words that whatever they are outwardly doing is pissing their parent off, but the Aspie may not grasp what this “embarrassment” is stemming from (they aren’t picking up on the facial expressions or body language of other shoppers in the store) and they weren’t able to pick up on their parents facial or body language that told them to stop acting a certain way long before the parent threatened them and told them they were bad.  The NT child would have observed all of these other nonverbal messages taking place around them as they escalated to the point of a temper tantrum.  The NT child will know very quickly the next time they are in a similar environment (even if it is equally overwhelming and intolerable) that they are going to get punished if they do not adapt their behavior, and they realize this the moment they begin seeing similar facial expressions or body movements from their parent or those around them.

    Eventually, the NT child will learn to adapt to such environments without feeling so overwhelmed and they will find themselves less upset when they have to enter into similar places in the future.  This is called Exposure Therapy and it is the same tactic utilized to help countless people overcome phobias every single day.  When an adult is afraid of confined spaces (claustrophobia), the psychotherapy used to help them overcome their fear is to directly expose them to it.  While the initial psychologic and emotional response will be incredibly overwhelming and unwanted for the sufferer, they will begin to adapt to each subsequent exposure with less misery.  The longer the therapy continues, the more likely they are to completely overcome this fear.  Since being an adult often requires exposure to confined places, such as being in a car, airplane, elevator, public restroom, etc. it is not conducive to living a fully-productive life if one chooses to tailor their environmental exposure to confined spaces around their claustrophobia.

    Going back to typical child development… all children have environmental stimuli or places that cause them personal distress.  Parents unknowingly provide exposure therapy throughout their development (before the child can express what is upsetting them) and the children do not know their parents are implementing this therapy any more than the parent has a clue they are utilizing it to help their child develop in a socially acceptable way.   Exposure therapy does not work the same way for the Aspie child after the age of four (my guesstimate) because they are missing all of the nonverbal communication to tell them how to behave.  By the time they are admonished for their behavior (like throwing themselves on the floor crying) by a parent, they have lost the lesson to self-regulate in the future.  Aspie children do not have the same ability to utilize this internal dialog and put themselves in check so that they can slowly begin modifying appropriate social responses (and eventually mitigate the overwhelming assault on their senses) the same way an NT child does.

    Since parents do not understand why their Aspie child is refusing to adapt to the world around them the same way an NT child would, they often become more authoritative and impose greater punishments in the hopes that this will alter their child’s future conduct.  In response to this increasing anger from their parents, the Aspie child begins to feel even more overwhelmed and their poor responses and aversions to environmental stimuli become enhanced.  When increasing authority and punishment do not work, most parents inevitably succumb to modifying their child’s environment to prevent undesirable behavior.  Sometimes they do this to diminish the overwhelming feelings they begin to personally have when faced with exposing their children to people and/or places that they often respond to poorly.  Sometimes these modifications are done to reduce their own stress or embarrassment, while other times it is done solely out of love for their child and not wanting to see them suffer or feel overwhelmed.  All of these adjustments are done to sooth stress in general and more often than not, the parents believe they are making “temporary” changes to handle their unique situation while they search for answers about what is “wrong” with their child, or a better means to help them.

    Unfortunately, the alteration of environmental stimuli to prevent unwanted behaviors or ease discomfort (for either party) only promotes the development of inflexible routines and rituals throughout the Aspies life.   While it is easier said than done (and usually happens because of a knowledge-deficit on cause and effect), the parents of those with Asperger’s syndrome should not be participating in accepting, qualifying, enhancing, providing, or appeasing these avoidant behaviors.  Doing so enables a continued resistance to change, an increased avoidance of new environmental exposures, and ultimately affords them the option to withdraw from social norms and necessary adult responsibilities and suitable conduct.   Common sense dictates that neither avoidance nor combativeness to displeasing environmental stimuli is appropriate or conducive with the executive function required of an adult.  None of these permissible actions prepares an adult Aspie for the NT adults who refuse to tolerate such rigid behaviors or negative responses that they were able to force acceptance of as children.

     

    An Aspie child who prevails in having their authority figures accommodate their negative behaviors with environmental modifications…

    becomes a demonstrative, rude, temper-tantrum-prone adult who expects the same from their intimate partner and children.

     

    What This Looks Like in My World

    Today started out fine.  I did not have to work and B was at school so both John and I slept in until 11:00 a.m.  We got up together at the same time, and I even brushed my teeth beside him (he recently commented that I never used the other sink in the double-sink bathroom).  John made snarky comments about me while he brushed his teeth (remarking that my armpits were making him gag when he was actually brushing too far back in his mouth and retching from it).  Being from a family that constantly picks at one another in jest (without ill-intentions or meaning), I take John’s comments to be light-hearted and know they are not usually meant to be hurtful.  After we brushed our teeth, John and I went into the kitchen together.

    I did not have intention of disregarding my husband’s “two-hour rule” when I walked out with him to begin our day.  I simply did not consider his typical morning ritual (as I often do) since we had been doing so well communicating with one another and expressing our feelings over the last nine months.  Today was the first morning we both woke up together in a long time, so my mood was happy and I unconsciously assumed his was as well.  Honestly, if I had thought about his morning-crankiness, I likely would have knowingly ignored it by choice today since it would have been my first experience with his morning routine in many months (I worked night shifts for a long time and was asleep before he woke up each day).  It is obviously no secret to you all that I think it is utter bullshit that anyone has to walk on glass for their husband to appease their rituals, so I felt the same about beginning my day today.

    I am a grown adult and when I wake up in a good mood, I have zero interest in allowing my grown adult husband’s behaviors to thwart the way I want to speak or move about my own home any longer.

     

    I do realize we have an incredibly long way to go before John admits to, or becomes aware of how he acts in the morning (or afternoon, if that is when he wakes up), but I am certain there is nothing to be gained by continuing to appease this nonsense just to keep the peace with him.

     

    Despite it not being purposeful today, I did not abide by this unspoken: “Two hours before I can stop tiptoeing around to avoid annoying John” law in our house.  I hate this previously accepted rule more than I can explain; it is disruptive to my normal routine and inadvertently casts a negative cloud on my mood for the rest of the day.  As it happens, my unintentional violation of this ridiculous and damaging rule for our morning interactions, spiraled into a real shit-show:

     

    Stupid Coffee Grounds!

    A while back John had a temper tantrum during an argument with me and threw our Keurig water filter at the back door and broke it.  Instead of replacing the water filter, I purchased a cheap (basic) coffee maker; one that has grounds remaining in need of disposal after each use.

    Since the first time John has used this piece of kitchen equipment, he has dumped the old grounds into the sink.  With “Make Coffee” existing as a part of his daily ritual, every single day there are coffee grounds chillin in the sink by the late afternoon.  What’s the big deal? Perhaps there isn’t one to the average person, but day after day, this has become a source of annoyance to me.  Dumping these grounds in the sink (filter and all) and allowing them to remain there long into the day, they often become someone else’s responsibility to clean.  While John does eventually clean them himself (about 50% of the time) they still remain there long enough to splash coffee water and grounds all over the sink, wall, and surrounding vicinity every time someone goes to wash their hands.

    I am a nurse and by default, my own obsessive hand washing has rubbed off on the family to the point that we wash our hands a lot (probably more than most).  This continued washing of hands and subsequent splashing of grounds everywhere but the sink, causes an incredibly impressive coffee-infused art display in places that no one else seems to notice (or clean) other than myself.

    I grew up with chronic-coffee-drinking-parents who would scold me if I ever attempted to wash the grounds down the kitchen drain in lieu of putting them in the garbage.  I clearly raised my daughter with the same belief that coffee grounds should never be put in the sink, so John’s disinterest in appeasing this disposal method equally irritates her.  Whether or not the stupid coffee grounds can safely wash down the pipes without screwing up the plumbing is not the issue at hand; the problem is that John does not attempt to rinse them away at all, he just drops the whole filter in the sink and leaves it there (until he or someone else opts to do dishes later in the evening).

    While this is a small nuisance in the grand scheme of life, it is easily remedied by simply turning the human body around and putting them in the garbage that is literally a step away from the damn coffee maker!  I have attempted to express this to John countless times, both nicely, with passionate pleas, and angry demands.  I have tried to implore logic to the situation and even agreed that it is not a big deal, but I would really love it if he would just dump them in the garbage instead.  John has not taken my requests into consideration and up until this morning, has continued to do the exact same thing he felt like doing… morning after morning, ritual after ritual.

    Since it had been a significant amount of time since I last observed this evil-deed in action, when John plopped the ground-filled filter into the sink this morning, I said, “Why do you put those in the sink? I don’t like it. Can you just throw them in the garbage instead please?”  Seemed like a nice way to put it; simple request, no hostility or accusatory words directed at him.  No anger in my voice, no judgement of his actions or threats to divorce him if he didn’t comply.  I just asked him for a rationale behind the behavior and requested he opt to do something different for my own mental-health benefit.

    What I got from John in response was typical of him when I begin to question anything that occurs during his two-hour morning process.  John replied to me with loud, annoyed, and rude words that all equated to, “Fuck you Kara, I do it because I want to and I am going to continue doing it because I want to and you’re annoying the shit out of me for even bringing it up!”   This is not what he actually said, but the gravity of his point was made with whatever words he chose to utilize to express the same sentiments.  I was not angry (although surprisingly taken aback by his response after a seemingly positive start to the day) and replied, “John, we don’t like when you do that, it’s gross.”

    Bad move on my behalf.

    Using the word “we” with my husband triggers an instant response of aggressive defensiveness as though he is being horrifically ganged up on by his wife and stepdaughter.  John highlighted my use of the word “we” as he began loudly vocalizing how he can do what he wants and defending his action as though he were a child whining about having to clean his room.  Since John is not a child, and I am not his mother, his loud and demonstrative retaliation to my simple statement was an unnecessary and inappropriate act of defiance.

    I fired back instinctively that he was being rude and that there was no reason for him to purposely do something that upsets me when it would take less effort overall to just throw the stupid grounds in the garbage.  John turned to look at the garbage can (overflowing with trash) and yelled,

    John: “I don’t like when the garbage is full either!”

    Me: “Then take it out when it is full!”

    John: “That’s not my job!!!!!!”

    Me: “It’s not my job either, it’s everyone’s job!”

    Somewhere along the way, John has decided that garbage is disgusting and he will have no part in touching it.  Due to this executive decision on his behalf, he will stack the garbage up around the lid so it is barely inside the can in order to prevent his hands from coming in contact with anything else.   While this is also an incredible irritating thing to me, I rarely say anything about it because I am aware of his aversion to handling garbage.  I have watched him yell at B when she does the same thing and demand she take it out, despite him refusing to himself (this is usually the only time I complain about what a hypocrite he is).

    After John’s garbage comment, I was finding my own self-control a little challenging.  The more he continued whining about this stupid request, the more I had to hold back from becoming angry with him.  He truly went on for 2-3 minutes in a loud, high-pitched tone ranting about the coffee grounds and garbage as though he were vehemently defending an unfair and ridiculous demand made by his dominating wife.  In an attempt to deescalate the situation, I began mocking his tone and pitch with similar sounds (“Meee meee meee, wahhh wahhh wahhh”) while smiling at him saying, “Why are you whining like that?  That is how you sound to me over something so silly.”

    Since I am still a fool and still forget that my husband cannot readily identify the nonverbal communication I am using, it did not occur to me that my words were actually pissing him off further.  He didn’t see my smile, or pick up on the body language that expressed I was not angry and was trying to ease the tension.  All John heard (in the face of his own poor behavior) was that I was making fun of him.  In a perfect example of how engaging my husband during his two-hour morning window goes bad quickly, John began to shift from a rude-whining adult man to a nasty and verbally abusive asshole.  Pissed off that I was not letting the coffee grounds issue go with his response that he would, “Do what he wants,” deciding that he was being ganged up on by my use of the word, “we,” and then assuming I was making fun of him, he unleashed a vicious attack to intimidate me into backing off:

    John: “SHUT THE FUCK UP! YOU’RE SO ANNOYING! SHUT THE FUCK UP, LEAVE ME ALONE! ALL YOU DO IS BITCH! SHUT… THE…FUCK…. UP!!!!  LEAVE ME ALONE!!!!”

    As angry as I was at his disgusting aggressiveness toward me, I opted to keep a low and non-threatening tone instead of matching his anger.  In the past, I would begin screaming back at John and the verbal exchange would lead to days of not speaking to one another.  If I didn’t immediately fire back at him, I would begin to cry and try to tell him how much his words were hurting me through pathetic sobbing.  I used to break down.  I used to cry hysterically for hours as I replayed his anger and think about how I deserved better; I would consider all of the reasons I should leave him and convince myself that staying with a man who could treat me in such a degrading way meant that I had no respect for myself.

    I never wanted to believe I had no self-respect.

    Since matching John’s anger and/or submitting to hysterics and questioning our entire relationship never accomplished anything good, and it had been a while since John came at me with such aggressively cruel words, I decided to try something different today.

                    Very calmly and directly I said, “Don’t talk to me like that.”

    John continued to be loud, aggressive, and nasty (no doubt everyone in the neighborhood could have heard him screaming).  Instead of allowing this intimidation tactic to prevail, I stood in the kitchen and continued to calmly speak through his hostility.  Each time I said something, I would break and allow for him to retaliate with anger and nastiness and then continue on with what I had to say in the same calm and direct way.

     

    Me:                “John, you have no right to talk to me like that, it is disrespectful and hurtful.  (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) I asked you to stop putting coffee grounds in the sink and instead of agreeing to try to put them in the garbage in the future, you chose to disregard what I was asking.  (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) You began to whine and defend a position that makes little sense to me and appeared to be out of sheer defiance of my request.  (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) When the whining did not make me go away, you got loud and tried to intimidate me.  (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) All this time you could have behaved like an adult… (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) You could have simply said you would stop putting the coffee grounds in the sink because I told you I did not like it.  (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) You chose to tell me you do not care how I feel about it… (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) You let me know you are going to continue doing what you want… (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) and you made it very clear that you would rather call me names and scream at me than behave like an adult who values his wife. (LONGBREAK TO ALLOW HIM TO CONTINUE YELLING) It is not ok for you to talk to me like that anymore and you cannot just attack me to make me go away from you.”

     

    Don’t get too excited, this method did not have instantaneous results!

     

    John continued yelling and calling me a nagging pain in the ass or telling me I was an annoying asshole who starts fights with him on purpose.  I am not even certain what he said because I have begun tuning out the nastiness he occasionally still spews in order to not take it personally. As John continued to yell (with a decreasing volume) I stated, “Grow up and try to act like an adult John” and began to walk away as he uttered the words, “I’m just not going to talk to you today!”

    John moved toward the sofa to drink his coffee and play video games and carry on with his morning ritual.  I went on the porch and began writing down what occurred before he could twist the events into something else and play on my poor memory to tell me he never said or did what I was upset about.  I wanted to get this experience down in writing so I could share it with you and show you how, despite an incredible change in our communication and marriage this past year, my husband and I are still met with challenges and residual behaviors that need to be corrected.

     

    So What Came of It?

    When I first sat down to write, I took a few minutes and allowed myself to feel pissed off, hurt, and deflated overall that we were still having these intense verbal exchanges with one another.  I was very frustrated that I still could not tell John something that I did not like without receiving an instant response of, “Tough shit, I don’t care” (in whatever words he used to express the same point).  I was still dumbfounded at the fact that when I did not just retreat after his dismissive reply, he would still choose to come at me with such disrespectful, verbally abusive, and terrible words.  I had to sit and think about this for a while before I was able to detach from how much it hurt me emotionally and focus on a solution to prevent it from reoccurring in the future.

    BREAKING TERRIBLE “LEARNED” BEHAVIORS IS NOT EASY PEOPLE

    Today was about disrupting a ritual of my husband’s and recognizing that his defensive guns still come out immediately on instinct when he incorrectly perceives an attack on his character.  While the cognitive empathy factor did play a role in how the dialog shifted from defensiveness to attack (as I missed that he did not see my nonverbal attempts to de-escalate the situation), cognitive empathy did not directly cause this situation to unravel (although it is the ultimate cause for his negative behaviors and rituals in the first place).

    John was being told something directly, during a time period he did not want to engage in communication with me, and behaved in a defiant, defensive, and over-the-top nasty way… he did this because this is how he naturally responds to any degree of perceived authority.  John had no reason to behave that way toward me, outside of the fact that he was being an asshole who did not want to be “told” what to do… in any fashion, for any reason, by anyone.

    It is that simple.

    This level of defiance is one thing, the completely disrespectful and degrading way he treated his wife, well that was something unacceptable and intolerable that I had to devise a plan to correct (or so I thought).

    There was not an initial misunderstanding that sparked this exchange between us, it was nothing more than John using the really shitty behavior he learned in his youth.  No level of empathy toward him after that exchange was going to override the fact that neither of us should be speaking to one another in such a demeaning and disgusting way… ever again.

    My goal as I sat down to write this post was to devise a plan to get John to acknowledge his behavior and feel embarrassed (or at least regretful) for how he spoke to his wife.  I wanted John to realize that his lack of emotional control over something so trivial caused our entire day to be ruined.  Considering I do not get many days off during the week, it was important to me that he realized the implication of his actions and subsequent loss of valuable time we could have spent enjoying one another’s company.  I also wanted John to identify that he was not being a team player and that if he expects others to listen to what bothers him and make adjustments to their actions for his benefit in the future, he would also have to begin listening to others and agree to alter some of his own actions.

    Without thinking it through, I stepped inside the house (I write on my back porch) and said aloud, “John, I am waiting for you to apologize to me.”

    This failed, as he responded, “Then you apologize to me.”  This is absolutely the typical reply I would have expected from him and if I had bet money on what he would say to me, I would have come out a big winner when he proved me correct.  Of course… that was not what I wanted him to say.  I remained quiet for a moment looking at the back of his head while he played his racing game and he loudly said, “Ok, fine. I’m Sorry!”  This would have been the very next response I could have hit the jackpot on as he had a hostile tone behind his words and I have heard that type of “non-apology” many times before.  I calmly and directly replied, “That is not an apology.”  To this I began to turn and walk back outside as I heard him angrily saying, “Then don’t demand an apology!”  He kept vocalizing something rude as I closed the door behind me and continued writing this post.

     

    This is Awesome!                

    As I began writing the first few paragraphs of this post I was mentally considering different ways I could get through to John that were different from my failed attempts in the past.  I had utilized the same attempt before (telling him I am waiting on an apology) and received the same response from him that he had just given me; a nasty non-apology and demand that I do the same.  Since this failed, I assumed I would have to be more creative and come up with something better.  I continued to write the events that transpired as my mind played out varying options.

    After about twenty minutes of typing away on my laptop, something surprising happened.  John opened the window that leads from the living room to the porch and kindly and softly said, “I am sorry I talked to you that way Kara.”  This was shocking to me because no more than an hour had passed since we had awakened and I definitely did not anticipate that he would even consider what transpired between us until his “morning routine” time frame had elapsed.  I continued to write and decided that I would try to approach the coffee-grounds topic later in the day.  About thirty minutes after his “real” apology, I went inside to get myself coffee and guess what John had done during that time?

    John threw away the coffee grounds and filter and cleaned the sink… and entire kitchen!

    John disrupted his morning routine, offered a heartfelt apology to me that told me he felt remorseful for speaking to me in a cruel and unwarranted way, and he chose to go further and make amends for his behavior by cleaning up.  He was well-into steam-cleaning the entire living room floor when I finally stepped away from my writing to engage him.  I made a point to tell him I was not going to allow the morning fight to ruin the remainder of our day.  I thanked him for cleaning the coffee grounds and told him I appreciated what he had done.

    So here’s the thing… prior to my discovery of cognitive empathy and learning to adapt my own behaviors, a morning like today would have led to days of fighting and tears.  I did not have control over my own emotional responses to my husband any more than he had control over his emotional responses.  Neither of us ever admitted to being at fault for anything, and neither of us were ever willing to budge on our own negative behaviors.

    We wanted the other person to change.

    Even after the incredible growth we have made as a couple, and even after my personal education and application of behavior modifications to prevent fighting…. I still walked away from our exchange this morning with the inappropriate desire to force John to change.  I still sat back and plotted a way to make my husband “feel sorry” and admit he was wrong, and I still believed that I had the personal power to force my will unto him.  If I had not remained outside after John apologized, or I had attempted to point out his wrong doing, or bring up the coffee grounds issue… John would NOT have made a conscious choice to modify his own behavior.

    I cannot tell you for certain (the day is not over) if John is going to repeat the same behavior tomorrow and dump those damn grounds into the sink as he carries on with his morning ritual once again.  I am willing to bet more money on the fact that he will not do that ever again, then I would have bet he was going to respond to my request for an apology the way he did.  I am willing to bet this because I am not the one who made John change his negative behavior.

    John made his own choice to accommodate my wishes because he wanted to make me happy.

                    John saw the positive outcome of his positive actions and had a wonderful day with me.  John is learning on his own that what he once thought was positive reinforcement (avoiding things that deviated from his own desires) by behaving in a negative way, are not so positive after all.

    I did not have to come up with a magic solution to force my husband into figuring out something that neurotypicals were blessed with comprehending from their childhood…

    all I had to do was stop accepting that negative behavior.

    Oh, but wait… isn’t that EXACTLY what he was not afforded in his youth that CAUSED his rigid routines in the first place? That somewhere along the lines, his loving parents and other adults began to accommodate his routines in order to avoid his negative behavior?

    Doesn’t that mean that if we (NT wives) stop doing this… stop accepting, stop appeasing, and stop ignoring the negative behavior… that we are effectively going to help teach our husbands what they should have learned as children?

    I can and will always look past my husband’s quirky behaviors, provided they are not adversely impacting my own emotions or the unity and happiness we need as a family.  If I can continue to stop feeding into his reactions with equal or surmounting negativity, then I believe eventually they will be replaced with appropriate and positive reactions.

    I can no longer modify my own behavior to appease the inflexible demands he holds from years of poor coping skills.  I can no longer make excuses for, or attempt to fight these behaviors either.  The only thing I can do to improve our communication (in regard to his ritualistic actions) is to calmly and directly tell him how I feel, what I want, and what the desired outcome can be if he considers a new way of handling an old routine.  Once I have afforded him the information (that neurotypicals are blessed with identifying easily from their youth), I need to step aside and let John choose how much he can comfortably begin changing.

    Aspies are not stupid.  Your Aspie husband is not an asshole, even if he appears to behave that way for no other reason you can comprehend.  My husband has a very challenging and uncomfortable road ahead of him.  He has to learn to undo things from his youth, things he is hardly aware exist in the first place.  My husband was not afforded the same opportunity to grow and adapt to the challenges in life that I was, and he was not afforded the ability to receive nonverbal information from those around him during his formative years… so that behaviors like today could have been avoided before they began.

    I cannot expect my husband to radically transform into a 36-year old man who responds maturely and appropriately to experiences that cause him sensory or emotional discomfort the same way a neurotypical man of the same age would.  I can be patient, I can be appreciative, and I can be supportive of the incredible challenges he faces and the exceptional effort he puts forth to overcome each and every one of them.

    It is my responsibility to love my husband with all of my being, the same way I desire his love for me.  It is my responsibility to stop being so aggressive in response to his instinctive defensive reactions, and it is my responsibility to ditch my use of nonverbal communication in favor of actual words… so he has a fighting chance at showing me how much he loves me.

    It is my responsibility to stop enabling his rigid routines that are preventing his own happiness and fulfillment in life (and for his family).  It is also my responsibility to be patient with him as he tries to change something that was once deemed impossible.

    Today I learned that I need to work harder on my own communication.  It became uncomfortably evident that knowledge alone, cannot alter subconscious and instinctive behaviors (for either of us).

    I know John cannot process cognitive empathy but yet… I still continue to use it in my attempts at communicating with him without even realizing I am doing it.  I learned that if my own effort and recognition of personal behaviors are so challenging to modify, then I should have more empathy for how overwhelmingly impossible altering instinctive behaviors must seem for my husband.

    Today, coffee grounds represented my husband’s willingness to deviate from an inflexible ritual that served to protect him in the past… all because he loves me.

    Who knows what tomorrow might bring?

    Update:  

    Tomorrow… and every day thereafter… John has thrown those stupid coffee grounds into the garbage can!

    Celebrate & appreciate every small success…

    THEY ADD UP


  • WHY IS IT UNFAIR TO SAY ASPIES HAVE ZERO EMPATHY?

    BECAUSE IT’S NOT TRUE

     

    I received a comment recently that I wanted to share as I think it will be a common source of confusion for others:  

    Please read my definition of cognitive and affective empathy HERE first (if you haven’t already)

     

    David wrote:  

    “I’m confused. You say aspies have zero empathy, but elsewhere you say they have affective empathy, just not cognitive empathy. From how you explain it, what you call “affective empathy” is what I have always thought was “empathy”. What you call “cognitive empathy” sounds like reading someone’s thoughts, which sounds impossible, but doesn’t sound like what I think of when I think of empathy. Isn’t it a little unfair to say someone has zero empathy when they do have affective empathy?”

     

    David,

    Awesome comment because you are absolutely correct! While my posts will center around all-things good and amazing about my Aspie husband in the future, I chose to begin this blog with a lot of the mis-information out there. If you read my WHY AM I SO ANGRY? post, you might think my husband was evil and I was a horrifically abused wife too dumb to leave him. That is how I felt for a long time, and how a lot of spouses (like myself) feel because they do not grasp the big picture yet. I wanted my posts to grab the current feelings of many of the wives out there… so they could first empathize with ME and realize I get what they are going through; hopefully lending some belief in my current thoughts and their desire to implement my suggestions in their own marriage.  My intention of striking a chord with the desperate NT wives out there is also why some of my post titles are seemingly negative and unfair to those with Asperger’s syndrome.  

    I can appreciate how the post you commented on WHAT DOES ALTRUISM HAVE TO DO WITH IT? seems very biased toward praising neurotypicals while blaming Aspie husbands for lacking empathy and damaging our relationships.  It was important to me to first acknowledge the incredible strength and mentality of those who fall in love with Aspie men because… I am going to be flipping it around in most of my future posts, beginning with this one.  

    I intend on showing all of the reasons our Aspie husbands are of equal strength and good intention and these same NT women often unknowingly create much of the misery in their marriage.  Since I began this blog entirely for neurotypical women struggling in their marriage, posts like the one you commented on do give confusing messages. Understanding the difference in cognitive and affective empathy, and how the function of both processing mechanisms paralyze communication, is the first step to finding a happy NT-Aspie union.  

    I never expected so many adult men and women with Asperger’s syndrome to take the time to read what I wrote and post their responses to it.  I am both delighted and humbled by this.  

     

    Back to why my words are unfair:

    It is incredibly unfair and cruel to suggest someone with Asperger’s syndrome does not have empathy in general. This belief is what destroys countless lives every day. This statement is what I want to change when people hear the term Asperger’s syndrome.

    Just like you, affective empathy is what EVERYONE thinks of when they hear the word.  Affective empathy is the most important part of what it means to be a compassionately empathetic individual. Affective empathy is what humanizes us and the common bond we have for one another that creates all the best things in life.  Only sociopaths (aka, psychopaths) lack affective empathy.  

    Obviously there exist other neurological anomalies and injuries that can debilitate empathy, but they also impair so many other neurological abilities that they are incredibly apparent… unlike Aspies and sociopaths who are elusive and have only empathy deficits to account for their cognitive differences with neurotypicals.  Again, sociopaths lack affective empathy but have cognitive empathy, Aspies lack cognitive empathy but have affective empathy (polar opposites).

    There is confusion about this because no one realizes there is an entirely different version of empathy (the cognitive part) that symbiotically functions to enable and enhance the affective part for neurotypicals.

    When someone cannot utilize their cognitive empathy the way the majority does, it stunts the affective part. It does not eliminate the fact that affective empathy exists and is fully functional for those with Asperger’s syndrome.  The absence of cognitive empathy disables the ability to show affective empathy appropriately based on the expectations of an NT (not their fault, this is because social norms that deviate from what NT’s comprehend as normal are viewed as negative and wrong).

    I am going to assume you have Asperger’s syndrome? I may be wrong but I am making this assumption based off of your summation that cognitive empathy sounds like “reading someone’s thoughts” (which it kind of is), and that does not sound logical or possible to you. If I did not possess this ability (and understand that those deemed neurotypical also do) than I would agree that such a concept sounds ridiculous.

    Of note: Not every neurotypical is good at utilizing their cognitive empathy effectively.

     

    No, I do not think I am psychic

    I do not think I can accurately look at a stranger (or anyone) and factually read their mind.  That would be CRAZY. What I do have (NT’s) is the ability to information-gather based off of someone’s facial expressions, body language, tone/pitch of voice, timing in delivering their words, taking in the same nonverbal language from those around this person, and the “hidden” meaning behind what someone says vice what they actually mean.  All of these things combined enable a person to come pretty close to accurately guessing what someone is thinking or feeling.  We learn to do this before grade school and it comes SO NATURALLY and rapidly we don’t even realize we’re doing it.

    As I have said before… the closer we are to a person (knowing their past behaviors, feelings, desires, or how they responded emotionally to a similar situation) the more likely we will guess what they are thinking/feeling correctly.  If it helps to call it “guessing” in lieu of “mind reading” then that is totally understandable and more accurate.  We are only guessing and no one can read another person’s mind; it just so happens NT to NT guessing is often spot-on.

    Since Aspies very rarely have “hidden meanings” in their words, and they cannot information-gather the same way we NT’s do… we (NTs) keep fudging everything up. We keep thinking there is hidden meaning in words, over-analyzing behaviors, and seeing the delay (or incorrect) response to our feelings as inappropriate, rude, aloof, condescending, mean, uncaring, insensitive, or cold.

    Eventually I hope I will help other neurotypical women to STOP DOING THIS!  Maybe when the NT women finally make sense of their husband’s behavior they can help create an army of advocates who want the world to also understand their incredible husbands.  

    Wishful thinking perhaps, but I believe it can be done.

    Understanding cognitive vs. affective empathy and how they work to enhance one another has to be very confusing and suspicious to someone who does not utilize cognitive empathy. I also realize the suggestion that an Aspie has zero cognitive empathy makes people with Aspergers feel angry that they are being deemed defective or broken.

    I think those highly empathetic neurotypicals (the wives of Aspie men usually are) and those with Asperger’s syndrome are both defective (SEE: WHY AM I SO STUPID?). With that being said, I do not for one second think that either of them are “broken”; just different.

    color

    If you don’t see the green number, you must not love me!

    My good friend is color blind.  He does not see the same thing when he looks at colors that I do. He is not broken for this, he just sees the world different than many of those around him.  My friend cannot control this, nor can he ever see the colors others do… he just has to accept that they exist for others.  My friend has a genetic mutation (I hate that word because it sounds bad) that causes the wiring in his brain to process color different.

    Someone with Asperger’s syndrome who cannot process cognitive empathy is not broken, they process information differently. Because it is the minority who has to navigate without that processing ability, Aspies end up being shunned and made to feel broken.

    My friend got made fun of for a long time for screwing things up that required the color vision capabilities of those around him. It might have been something simple like picking up the wrong color legos or puzzle pieces as a child, to painting his home in unappealing colors as an adult.  Sometimes people made fun of him and he felt like he screwed things up (but he never knew why).  When my friend finally learned he was color blind to some of the shades others could see, he stopped thinking he was a screw-up. When he was able to articulate this to people, they stopped giving him a hard time when he showed up in a green shirt instead of a blue one (military) or other areas where color-selection comes into play.  The people who were close to him began to help him instead or teasing him, like his wife laying out the correct color undershirt for him to wear to work the night before, or helping him navigate through other color-conundrums. 

    Lucky for my friend, something like color-processing is not often associated with personal feelings so when he had messed up in the past, his character was not attacked for being “uncaring and cold.”

    Lacking cognitive empathy adversely effects how easily a person can show affective empathy and therefore… people take this difference in neurologically processing information as personal.  Aspies get screwed by a society who thinks they just lack empathy altogether.

    They do not lack it, they simply cannot show it the same way we neurotypicals anticipate unless we directly state what we are thinking or feeling.  But alas, we don’t accept this different perspective because we don’t understand it… neither Aspie nor NT does.

    If only I could think that way…

    The honesty and simplicity in how those with Asperger’s syndrome communicate is something to appreciate and emulate. It is what we NT’s should be striving for in many ways.

    It would be so much easier if we could stop basing our own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors off of our assumed reality.  How many problems would be solved if neurotypicals just stopped reacting to what someone was “thinking” and chose to directly ASK THEM instead (and also believe their response as the truth)?  NTs are NOT always correct in their guess-work (obviously) and they are awful at it when they are guessing about their Aspie husband.

    It can screw us NTs up from time to time and cause us to believe a reality that does not exist… like when we assume we read nonverbal messages correctly but are way off target and then react to those messages by being upset, angry, offended, etc.. Sometimes our cognitive empathy steers us in the wrong direction but if we utilized the direct language Aspies use, we could avoid the whole misunderstanding.  This is what occurs the majority of the time in Aspie-NT marriages because we cannot read a person with Aspergers the way we can read an NT.  The reason for this is that Aspies lack cognitive empathy and therefore they do not operate under its existence in their lives. They are equally unaware of how their nonverbal messages come across to the outside world as they are about the nonverbal messages coming from it.  Without the knowledge of how they send out nonverbal messages, they never learn (from social interaction in childhood development) how to regulate their facial expressions, body language, etc. This regulation begins to occur without thought for NT’s so 9/10 times, the nonverbal messages they are sending out directly match the inner thoughts and feelings they are having.  With an Aspie, there is a disconnect with that and the nonverbal messages they are sending out do not often accurately match the internal thoughts and feelings they are having.  Neurotypicals don’t know this though, so they are receiving incorrect messages frequently from the Aspie in their life and they are responding to them as truth.

    Let me try to clarify.  Let’s say there is a neurotypical 5 year old child grocery shopping with their mother and their mom accidentally pushes the cart into their little leg. The child may feel a slight pain and make an automatic facial expression that reflects this pain.  The mom apologizes profusely to the child, who is in no way upset with their mom for the accident, and continues to make the same facial expression of pain because now their leg is hurting a little when they walk.  About ten minutes later, the mom notices that the child still has this look on their face but since time has elapsed and mom thinks it could no longer be a look of pain, she begins to associate the look with being angry at the mom for hurting them.  Mom again begins to apologize profusely and the child says, “I know you didn’t mean it, it’s ok mom.”  

    If this look keeps up (because the leg is still sore) the mom may eventually say, “I said I was sorry, why are you so mad at me?”  The child, having never said they were mad (quite the opposite) will then become aware that they are giving a facial expression that makes mom think they are in fact, angry.  This triggers those synapses to connect the dots between the face they are making and it’s confusing message and they automatically adjust this facial expression in the future.  This happens without purposeful intention… it is just the way the brain naturally wires itself through experiences in childhood.  The next time someone does something by accident, this child will automatically avoid that facial expression of discomfort so they do not make the accidental offender feel guilty, unless of course… they want the person to feel bad, then the look will remain (something that also occurs without thought).

    Hard to believe this happens, but it does.  

    That is how a neurotypical brain adapts to its social environment… so that their nonverbal messages do not cause unwanted emotional responses in others.  This happens in thousands of situations growing up and become an unspoken language based off of sending/receiving messages nonverbally throughout their youth.  This is why a neurotypicals ability to identify someone’s feelings (another neurotypicals) without the use of direct language become fairly accurate the closer they are to them.

    This is not the case with a person who has Asperger’s syndrome.  The Aspie child in the same situation will NOT understand that their facial expression is making their mother think they are angry.  They will know that they are in pain and their nonverbal messages will send out whatever response it wants to at that moment and there will exist no connection between the mother’s emotional response of guilt and their uncontrollable outward manifestation of whatever made her think this.  They will not even identify that their mother is feeling guilty when she says, “I said I was sorry, why are you still mad at me?”  They will take her words at face value; they may repeat the same sentence or say, “I know you didn’t mean it, I already said it was ok mom.”  They will not be aware that mom is giving them nonverbal messages in her question that show a face of guilt, or that her tone of voice is apologetic and she is really saying, “I am really sorry, I would never want to purposely hurt you.  I am concerned you think I did it on purpose because your facial expression is telling me that and that makes me feel badly that you would think that about me.  Please tell me you are not angry, and then please stop making a face that makes me think you are so I don’t feel guilty anymore.”  

    Holy crap that is a LOT of information mom thinks she is sending out to her child.  She doesn’t know she is speaking to her child without the use of those words because she naturally sends out a long paragraph of thought while only using words that unclearly summarize all those feelings.  The child is only hearing what mom said and therefore they may mentally process that mom must really think they are mad, but maybe she just didn’t hear them when they said they knew it was an accident and it was ok.  So they repeat themselves and they unknowingly keep the same facial expression of discomfort when they begin walking again, causing mom to think the child is purposely trying to cause her to feel badly for what she did.  By the time they reach the check-out line, mom may scoff at the child and say, “It’s ridiculous you are so angry about this, it was just an accident and you have no reason to be angry, stop being a baby!”

    Well, damn… that poor Aspie kid didn’t do a anything wrong and never “caused” his mom’s inevitably hurtful accusation.  Now the Aspie child is feeling angry… and they are absolutely justified in this!  Now the Aspie child WILL display a facial expression of anger or try to defend themselves, or get frustrated, feel hurt, and ultimately think they were treated unfairly (which is true).  What happens to Aspie children like this?  That’s when you see the good ol term, “temper tantrum” in full effect.  What happens to an adult like this? Well, that’s when you see a defensive and hostile response that makes the other person think the Aspie is an asshole.  It all makes perfect sense when you look at the big picture, but since no one grasps the cognitive empathy deficit, no one ever finds resolution in what actually caused the situation to unravel.

    In a scenario that innocent, the Aspie ends up receiving a very confused message that their mom is accusing them of feeling something that they are not feeling and they do not have a clue why.  The mother is not conscious of her use of cognitive empathy and therefore… she has no clue what kind of message she is sending her child by using words that are not in synch with the information she intended to send. The mom feels guilty for accidentally hurting her child and then becomes frustrated the child is angry, she begins to assume the child thinks she pushed the cart into them on purpose and feels hurt and eventually, irritated that the child would think that.  

    That is the speed and degree of emotional shifting a neurotypical does unknowingly when they are deciphering the nonverbal messages they receive. There is no direct articulation of words to ask questions or seek clarification for how the mom is receiving her child’s nonverbal message, so there will be no understanding of one another’s seemingly baffling behavior.  When the “baffling behavior” begins to pile up over time, both parties become further separated in their perception of one another and ability to understand the way the other thinks.

    Make sense?  Explaining a concept as abstract as cognitive empathy is incredibly difficult because it is not something that can be taught and most people are completely unaware of its existence.  They either use it, or they don’t; few are aware of who is using it, and who is not.  Aspie’s assume no one has this ability to read nonverbal messages (because they don’t) and neurotypicals assume everyone does (because they do).

    In the innocent grocery store example, you may now see HOW MANY different “feelings” can be in play for the neurotypical; guilt, frustration, confusion, irritation, etc. while the Aspie doesn’t really have any “emotional feelings” going on, they are just experiencing physical discomfort.  The aspie will eventually begin to emotionally feel anger though because they are being accused of feeling something that they are not.  

    CAUSE AND EFFECT

    The inevitable feelings of anger that the Aspie has after constant and unrelenting accusations about their inner thoughts and feelings (throughout their lifetime) become the recipe for an argumentative, withdrawn, and/or defensive adult.  They learn to associate social interaction with being accused of untrue things and they respond to this the same way any human would… they begin to assign “trigger” words that can alert them to respond appropriately before they are attacked.  Cause and effect.  If they are used to being called uncaring, naive, gullible, insensitive, malicious, cold, robotic, inappropriate, angry, sad, rude, condescending, thoughtless, stupid, selfish, or any other hurtful term hurled at them by an NT who inaccurately deciphered their innocent nonverbal messages as such… they are going to defend their own character the moment they think one of those labels is about to be launched at them.  Some become hostile and demonstratively defensive adults who argue before the words can even be said, others become withdrawn entirely to protect themselves from ever allowing those words to manifest by another person. Most adult Aspies end up doing both. 

    This is what happens to a ridiculously heightened degree with interpersonal relationships between Aspies and NTs. They are both speaking two different languages and one way or another, the NTs rapid shifting and attempts to identify the Aspies thoughts and/or feelings will turn to some form of accusatory verbal language directed at the poor Aspie who “Didn’t even do or say anything!”  They do not see the world through the same eyes when it comes to social interaction and interpersonal communication.  

    The only way to bridge this gap is for the NT to become aware of their use of cognitive empathy when communicating with the Aspie and make damn sure they are using plain language to send information and gather information in the future.  They cannot base any information off of the nonverbal messages they “think” they are receiving from their Aspie mate.  Even if some of those messages do end up accurately identifying the Aspie’s thoughts or feelings, they have to pull the plug on thinking they will the next time.  The person with Asperger’s syndrome will never respond the same way every time to a similar emotion or feeling because they do not have the neurological connections in place to repeat these things or become aware of them.  

    The only way to prevent such disastrous misunderstandings from happening is if the NT learns to never associate their partner’s nonverbal messages with the words they are speaking out loud.  They absolutely have to stop trusting their history of being skilled in identifying what others think and feel based off of nonverbal language.  They have to disassociate the link between nonverbal and verbal information and BELIEVE their Aspie loved ones words over their often contradicting nonverbal behavior.

    Neurotypical wives who want to find effective communication within their marriage to a man with Asperger’s syndrome will literally have to learn a new method of communication.  The Aspie cannot, I repeat, they CANNOT adapt to the neurotypicals way of sending and receiving messages.  They do not have this ability and they should not be expected to develop it, nor should they be held accountable for not using it.  The change MUST come from the neurotypical if they really want to have the intimate connection they claim to desperately want from their Aspie partner.  

    This is the #1 most important thing that must be done to turn a failing Aspie-NT union into a successful and happy one.  It isn’t easy and it is going to take a lot of awareness on the neurotypicals behalf to do this… but it is worth every bit of effort.  

    JUST TO BEAT A DEAD HORSE

    The neurotypical will never be able to accurately understand how their Aspie partner really feels about something if they are creating the information based off inaccurate nonverbal messages.  The Aspie is never going to accurately understand how the NT partner thinks if the verbal messages they receive are only a tiny fraction of the whole, which was sent predominantly through nonverbal communication that they cannot receive.  

    The cognitive empathy deficit disables the Aspie from ever responding appropriately to their NT loved one; in essence… it paralyzes their ability to utilize and show affective (emotional) empathy.  They have it… they have emotional empathy just the same as the neurotypical… but how can they show it when they have zero understanding of when, why, or how to use it at the right time?  The neurotypical is never going to utilize their emotional empathy appropriately toward their mate if they are trying to respond to feelings and thoughts that aren’t real.

    Tell an Aspie you are sad and why… in plain language, and if they love you, you will see emotional empathy.  Assume they know you are sad and why, and you are going to get an inappropriate response.  

    Now tell me, who’s fault is that really?

    BUT… THERE IS A GOOD SIDE TOO

    Not all cognitive empathy abilities for an NT are troublesome.  While neurotypicals obviously screw things up a whole lot with their Aspie loved ones, it is that use of cognitive empathy that enables amazing relationships with NT-NT individuals.  Having the instinctive ability to identify the thoughts and feelings of others without spoken words helps us offer our support, emotional empathy, love, assistance, and general regard for people rapidly without them ever having to ask for it.  Often times, adults do not want to directly ask people to fill the void of emotional needs.  For instance, if someone has just gone through a divorce, but is trying to put on a positive and optimistic face… an NT will usually become acutely aware of the facade based off of the other (unintentional) nonverbal messages being sent out.  They can respond with the emotional support the heartbroken person would benefit from without them having to ask.  The divorced individual does not have to feel weak, codependent, burdensome, or needy (which may further assault their fragile ego) because they did not have to reach out for help… help just arrived.

    It is pretty amazing to be able to respond to people’s emotional needs without delay and with the appropriate response; this develops trust and feelings of love.  This develops intimacy in romantic relationships.  This is what the neurotypical is expecting from their Aspie partner, who honestly… wants to provide all of the same rapid support to the NT they love.  The sad truth is that they can’t.  They can’t until the NT learns to use direct, unambiguous verbalization of what they need out loud.  They cannot expect it the way they would in an NT-NT dynamic.  That is not fair and it is counterproductive to obtaining the emotional empathy they claim to be deprived of.  

    NT’s keep thinking that if their Aspie partner cannot “identify” what it is they need, then they must be devoid of understanding human emotion… they must not have it themselves.  This is untrue and this is a thought-process that you are creating based off incorrect assumptions.  My husband used to say, “Your mind is your own worst enemy!” I despised him when he said this to me, as though he was calling me crazy, or telling me I was imagining all of the hurt feelings I had for feeling unloved by him.  The truth is… my mind WAS my own worst enemy.  I imagined things that weren’t true based off of my own understanding of neurologically processing emotions and correct behavior.  I knew I loved, I knew I felt empathy, and I knew I gave all of my effort in trying to provide those feelings to my husband.  I assumed he could do the exact same and when he did not, my mind created the reason for it.  He can do the exact same… love, feel empathy, and provide both of those things to me.  He just needs to get the right information from me in order to show me those things.  I allowed my lack of awareness to turn my husband into someone he was not and blame him for causing me harm that honestly… my own mind unknowingly created. Hard pill to swallow, but the survival of our marriage was dependent on it.

    IT’S ALL ABOUT AWARENESS   

    Just as a neurotypical has no idea how their communication abilities cause harm to their Aspie partner, the Aspie partner is equally blind to the damage they cause.

    Trying to put myself in my husband’s shoes and imagine a world where cognitive empathy does not exist was damn-near impossible at first (why no one wants to listen to the simplicity and innocence of it all). It is just as hard for us to grasp a world without this ability as it must be for an Aspie to grasp a world with it.

    Example: If you were holding up a red coffee mug and tried to convince me it was green, there is no way I would buy into your words… nor would I believe you were really seeing green. I would wonder why you were being snarky or screwing with my head and then over-analyze why you would want to do this.  You would also find yourself completely dumbfounded as to why I kept calling the mug red when it was clearly green; you might even think I was crazy and doubt my opinions in the future.  Neither of us would be wrong; it would just take a giant leap of faith for one to believe the other is TRULY seeing that color and not just messing with them.

    To bridge the gap of the Aspie/NT processing of cognitive empathy, both people have to take a giant leap of faith and trust that they see the world different. It is only in that leap of faith and trust in the other person’s reality that they can both utilize their amazing affective empathy skills to make a relationship work. 

    Let me try it this way…

    150226_SLATEST_TheDress-proof590.jpg.CROP.cq5dam_web_1280_1280_jpeg

    This dress is a big topic of discussion on the internet that makes people stop and think about the way they perceive the world in contrast to others.  When I look at this dress, I see white and gold.  In NO way am I capable of seeing blue and black (believe me, I tried).  Some people will look at it and say it is blue and black (it actually IS) and wonder how in the hell I am seeing white and gold.  My daughter (who I like to think is a mini-me) only sees blue and black and thought I was nuts for seeing white and gold. Since I wanted to believe my daughter and I looked at the world through similar eyes, I felt incredibly sad when I realized (based off of this image) that even she and I see the world different; even more disturbing was the concept that my own mind can perceive something ENTIRELY incorrect based off of the way the synapses that control color-processing function within my own brain.  Neither of us are “wrong” for what we see, as the dress is still pretty and exists, we just don’t see the same thing.  Yes, technically I am “wrong” but my perception is neither harmful nor purposefully argumentative in calling the dress color as I see it.

    Considering the dress IS actually blue and black, it appears my brain is the one that deviates from the norm in color-processing under certain lighting.  This is what it is like for an Aspie vs. an NT.  The NT is processing the information for cognitive empathy like the majority that have that brain function while the Aspie (who lacks cognitive empathy) gets a different take on the same human behaviors.  

    Now that I KNOW my eyes deceive me with the image above, I would be more inclined to trust my daughter’s perception if we had a debate on what color something was in the future.  No matter how hard I try, I am NOT going to see this dress as blue and black.  It cannot be done.  My brain is not capable of doing it.  If I had not been proven wrong by seeing an image of the dress on a storefront rack and having the owner of it validate that it is blue and black… I would have gone to my grave telling my child it is white and gold and she is WRONG.  As humans we are flawed, we want to convince others of our reality in lieu of accepting and appreciating the opposing viewpoint they have… we don’t want to be wrong and we don’t want to take these giant leaps of faith in what reality actually means.  

    It is incredibly hard to trust someone else’s take on the world when you cannot see what they do.  It is incredibly difficult for an Aspie to trust in this ability we have: to rapidly put a myriad of nonverbal communication behaviors together to identify someone else’s thoughts and feelings (cognitive empathy).  It is incredibly challenging for an NT to believe their Aspie loved one is truly incapable of doing the same and realize that their inability to see the same thing is not bad or wrong.  Nothing changes the fact that both NTs and Aspies comprehend human emotion equally and want to compassionately respond to it with the same level of concern and attention.  We both want the same thing and understand the complexity of human emotion… we just identify it in a very different way.

    Neurotypicals reluctance to accept this, or their ignorance about the Aspie’s perception is causing them to place unfair and impossible expectations on their Aspie partner.  We expect them to identify our feelings when we are using nonverbal means to communicate them.  They cannot behave empathetically toward us (affective empathy) if they cannot identify what we are thinking or feeling by using cognitive empathy.  They have the same desire to be empathetic toward our feelings as we do theirs, we are on the same page with this… we just drop the line of communication when we believe our perception of reality is the only one that exists.  

    Both people have to stop and accept the other person’s capabilities and limitations so they can appreciate the contrasting world they frequently exist in.  Both parties have to begin trusting the other’s take on the world, even if they cannot see it themselves, just as I now have to trust my daughter may be right more times than not when we perceive colors differently.  I have no choice but to trust in her insight now that I finally understand my brain may not always perceive reality accurately.  It sucks to have to admit I am not always right in my processing of information, I am human and I have an ego.  

    If the Aspie husband was willing to trust his wife and what she can see, he could have an incredible teacher and advocate in navigating social norms for the remainder of his days.  If the Aspie husband was willing to accept that something exists by which he cannot process and trusted his wife’s view… there is a damn good chance she would begin comprehending his take on life with greater ease and learn to use verbal language to directly communicate what she is thinking or feeling.  There is a high likelihood she will finally stop using her information-gathering cognitive empathy to guess her husband’s thoughts and begin to just ASK HIM instead.  If the Aspie husband could accept that his wife has an equally challenging time learning to communicate without her instinctive use of reading and delivering nonverbal messages, he would be more patient with her frustration when she vocalizes anger or sadness that he did not recognize or respond appropriately to her emotions.  

    Both Aspie and NT have to stop their current defiance.  They need to openly admit to one another that the other person is NOT WRONG.  It is time to drop the damaging assumption that their version of reality is the correct one.  It is time to humbly admit defeat in the history of ego-driven and forceful attempts to make the other person exist in their version of reality.  There can be no “agreeing to disagree” there must be a mutual understanding that it is time to “”agree to agree” with one another’s truth.  There is a whole lot of fascinating experiences out there if an Aspie-NT can stop being so stubborn and appreciate one another’s differences and utilize them to benefit their own awareness in such a mind boggling world.  

    It all begins with truly comprehending and accepting the difference in cognitive vs. affective empathy.

     

    Oh no, what was I saying?

    I forgot I was writing a reply to David when I originally began this post.  

    My apologies.  I do that.

    Ok, so getting back to the point; yes, it is unfortunate and unfair to say that someone with Asperger’s syndrome has zero empathy.  Like you, most people only associate empathy with the affective side (something that is not defective in either party).  

    If people could comprehend early on that cognitive empathy does not exist for everyone (more people than anyone could fathom) then they would be able to change the way children are raised and how misunderstandings in social interactions occur early on (setting Aspies up for a life of being unfairly judged and labeled).

    Just because someone is deemed a neurotypical does not mean they always utilize their cognitive empathy effectively.  There are TONS of people out there who have the ability to process cognitive empathy but are limited in its use due to the way they were raised or experiences in their past. Understanding this difference in early childhood would benefit more people than anyone realizes and help to prevent much of the childhood alienation and bullying we have seen in the past.  The only difference between a neurotypical and a person with Asperger’s syndrome is that a neurotypical CAN develop and strengthen their use of cognitive empathy.  An Aspie does not have the neurological tools to ever develop theirs (they are never going to change the colors identified in that damn dress).  Aspies will always need the neurotypicals in their life to minimize their nonverbal communication or at least assign words with it.  

    I believe the married Aspies out there CAN begin to connect the dots of their spouses feelings and emotions (without the use of words) eventually, provided the NT wife continues to verbally articulate them while she is also using her nonverbal communication.  I do believe the repetition of words with facial expressions or actions, or explanations of thoughts that were initially expressed with indirect words, can be linked up after a while to help that couple meet closer to the middle as time progresses.  The jury is still out on this though as my marriage is not that old and it currently seems that repetition would need to occur for many years (using both verbal and nonverbal at the same time) before my nonverbal messages could become readily identified by my husband. 

    I hope I did not confuse you further. If you have not read my novel-sized post about empathy, please do (See: WHAT ABOUT ASPERGER’S SYNDROME AND EMPATHY).  I give a lot more examples of what the cognitive vs. affective behaviors look like in action to show how they feed off one another negatively in Aspie-NT interpersonal relationships. 

    Thank you for taking the time to read and consider my thoughts. I hope that others will express their confusion as you have and give us more insight or opportunities to clear up misunderstandings.  

     


  • HOW ARE ASPERGER’S SYNDROME AND AUTISTIC DISORDER DIFFERENT?

    The real question should be:

    “HOW ARE THEY THE SAME?”

     

    I was drafting a response to a comment by an amazing woman named Hilary who had taken the time to offer her insight and share personal accounts in reply to some of the things I have written when it occurred to me that she was addressing common sentiments I have read time and time again.  Ultimately, I decided that perhaps it would be better served to create a post addressing these comments in lieu of simply replying to her.

    How and why do I think Aspergers and Autism should be separated at this time with our current comprehension of all-things-ASD?  I am going to launch into some seriously obnoxious rants about neuroscience from my current level of comprehension to help answer why I am such a staunch advocate for this.

     

    I apologize to anyone who is an actual neuroscientist for I will most certainly dumb-down and trivialize what you understand and possibly motivate you to provide more articulate education on the subject matter.  You are welcome to do this (and I think you are badass and envy your level of intelligence and chosen profession) but there is a good chance the readers will be equipped with the same capacity to grasp something so complex that I am and your words will fly far over our heads!

    First, (and most important) I need to give credit to Hilary who inspired this post by sharing what she wrote in reply to my (thus far) controversial opinions and unfiltered slaughtering of the DSM-5 diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder:

    “Having Asperger’s comes with sensory issues that are not going to respond to medication or therapy with a mental health professional. These sensory processing issues cause a lot of problems with perception and get in the way of functioning. Also the muscle memory often doesn’t work well with Asperger’s so things like hand writing just do not improve with time or practice the way it would for an NT. How is a mental health professional going to address things like this? We have had to make so many accommodations to daily life in our home to function well, because of that I am thankful that Asperger’s is lumped with Autism. I was in counseling for a long time, it did no good. Also, antidepressants had a terrible outcome. There are environmental changes which once they’re made, make it much easier to function normally, then the symptoms are decreased and the person can progress. Counseling could help provide coping techniques, but the sensory issues that are at the heart of Asperger’s need to be addressed. There are also so many physical medical conditions that contribute to or result from Asperger’s- both of my children wear glasses, have hearing issues, gastrointestinal issues, sleep problems, etc. that when we treat one of those, they are more able to function emotionally and socially. Psychiatry can’t touch those and they have a major impact on where they’re at on the spectrum.

     I hear how upset you are and I’m sorry that this is so frustrating. I feel angry a lot too. I see your points, and they are valid. It’s quite possible that I don’t understand you fully, I don’t understand the technical aspects of this. All I know is that with getting help for my children, their medical and sensory issues have to be cleared up if we want to make lasting changes to the social/emotional parts. Just the sleep disturbances/breathing problems alone cause so many meltdowns during the day. Both are high functioning and you wouldn’t realize that they have so many medical issues, but they do. The blanket term Autism, helps us to look at these problems as part of the whole. Mental illness also goes hand in hand much of the time just because of how stressful growing up with Autism/Asperger’s is and how people treat you when you have it. It can start to overshadow the true problems, which if cleared up would help a lot. 

     One final thought- the DSM is based off of and changes with social norms. Being gay used to be in the DSM along with many other things that we no longer consider to be mental illness. I share your anger in the money that is being made off of the people who are suffering. A lot of money is made off of people believing that something is wrong with them. More understanding, love and patience would be a good thing all around. Our society makes me sad and I don’t put a lot of stock in these labels. People intrinsically know when they aren’t loved for who they are and it causes all sorts of odd behavior. Much can be avoided if we understand that we cannot change another person and instead meet them where they’re at and love them unconditionally.”

     

     First, I absolutely appreciate her words and agree with the comment that we should accept one another as we are and love them unconditionally.  I will disagree with the fact that I believe we should try to change some things about people.  We can change, all of us, in various ways to become our very best selves in life and in relationships (not that she was suggesting against this).  I want to change my husband’s negative behaviors and I am hell-bent on doing so, even if that means I am an unaccepting jerk to others.

    Ok, so I am a self-proclaimed ADHD sufferer in need of some serious medication, so you may imagine what rabbit holes my brain took me down after reading her comment.  After a lot of effort to ground myself (sort of) I was able to organize some degree of structure to address her words:

    I wonder if those who can share these feelings (their spouse or children) were ever receiving counseling for an Aspergers or Autistic diagnosis by a professional who specialized in one of those “disorders” (I HATE that word!) before the DSM change grouping it all under ASD?

    I would be interested to hear from those who could give examples of how the therapeutic benefit of the ASD focus provides better assistance then having the two treated separately. Unfortunately, I doubt if there are many who can provide this example because the challenge to even find someone who specialized in Aspergers was so difficult (easier in the U.K. and Australia then the U.S. though) before and now in the U.S. is near-impossible.

    Since I am a believer that Aspergers should be treated by itself, I find it hard to see a benefit to the professional who is in favor of merging the two together.  It was mentioned that neither counseling nor medications ever benefited the commenter personally.  While I am always sorry to hear that, I am sadly not surprised.  I think in regard to counseling, most are/were never given the opportunity to see a therapist that was truly knowledgeable about how to help them in the first place (if they do have or warrant an Asperger diagnosis).

    As for the medication to treat Aspergers; useless.  If it is not a hormonal or chemical imbalance causing the problems experienced but just a different processing ability within the brain that is hard-wired from before birth, those medications COULDN’T HELP.

    SCREW YOU PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES!!!

    Unless science figures out the neurological mapping and/or medications that can awaken parts of the brain that are not active, or connect specific identified pathways that are affected in Aspergers/Autism vs. NT cognitive processing, the medications out there being recommended are going to continue to be useless.  I strongly believe this but unfortunately, I cannot back my words with scientifically proven facts since few find it worthy of investigating further.  Medications are only beneficial after the unnecessary stress of needlessly trying to adapt to another way of thinking causes so much emotional turmoil to an Aspie adult that a medication may provide relief in numbing some of it.  Even then, I am suspicious of how an antidepressant that targets chemicals within the brain is going to help an Aspie who may have a differing baseline than the majority-NT’s they were originally studied to help.

    While I do believe the sensory issues sometimes common to both Aspergers and Autism can be effectively treated with similar behavior and environmental interventions, I do not think the social ones can be.  Often people forget that these exact same sensory issues Aspies have (not those with Autism) are also something that NT’s experience very frequently, so I have not been convinced they are as linked to Aspergers or each other as the professionals are suggesting.  I think it is more of the way the resulting stress of those sensory issues outwardly present themselves in those with Aspergers that keeps mistakenly highlighting them as symptoms of the disorder.  Regardless, they should not be managed the same way by a mental health standpoint since the cognitive processing is likely to be so different.

     

    Here I go on my tangent about the human brain from my basic understanding…

     

    HOW IS INFORMATION PROCESSED IN THE BRAIN?

    An individual’s brain contains approximately 100 billion nerve cells referred to as neurons.  There are upwards of 10,000 synapses that connect one neuron to another (give or take a few thousand) and one neuron can be connected to 5,000-200,000 other neurons.  Glia cells are the cells that support neurons and can clean up dead ones, or enhance the function of active ones.  Neurotransmitters are the chemical mediums by which signals flow from one neuron to another.

    HUH?

    Imagine that I am holding a landline telephone in my hand (neuron) and I am attempting to share a one word response to someone’s question who lives across the globe (who is also holding a landline telephone in their hand), but it takes 10,000 different wires (synapses) to get my message to the other side of the world.  These wires (synapses) can effectively send my message to the other person, and also enable upwards of 200,000 thousand other people holding a landline telephone in their hands to hear it the very moment I dial the number and an electrical current is transmitted through them (neurotransmitters).  Enabling these wires to function are thick cables surrounding them that protect my transmitted message and keep it whole, as well as countless humans working to clear them of debris and rid faulty or broken cables along the way that could affect the pathway (glia).  Now consider that if you cut even one of those wires, the word on the other end may be received garbled or it may be a different word with the same meaning to the one I spoke, or an entirely different and opposing word altogether… OR… it comes across in a different language!

    TRACKING??

    Hopefully now you have my elementary understanding of how messages are sent and received in the brain.  Let’s move on to the structure and function of the brain now.

      

    THE INCREDIBLE AND POORLY UNDERSTOOD HUMAN BRAIN

    Your brain is housed inside of a thick skull (laughing at myself) on top of your awesome body.  It is comprised of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem.  The cerebrum is the largest part with left and right hemispheres that control the opposing side (ie, if you jack up your left side the right side of your body will be adversely affected and vice versa).  The cerebrum is the ultimate controller of functions like vision, hearing, speech,  learning, sensations, reasoning, emotions, and fine motor movements.

    The cerebrum is where the differences exist in Asperger’s syndrome and Autism!

    The cerebellum (underneath the cerebrum) is our controller of posture and balance because it determines all coordinated muscle movements.  The brainstem is our life (without the other two we could still technically be alive) as it controls breathing, heart rate, thermoregulation, digestion, swallowing, sleep/wake cycles, etc.  You might now be seeing that the cerebellum and brainstem likely play a role in the the Autism-related “medical” issues, but they do not play a role in the Asperger ones (or lackthereof) at the same frequency despite the professionals who keep calling them symptoms of both disorders. The medical issues associated with Autism may have root causes in the cerebrum as well, but in Aspie and NT individuals, the likelihood of problems stemming from the cerebellum and brainstem are equal.

     

    It is a *KARA-FACT* that the the cerebrum is 100% accountable for all things Aspie/NT!

    As a nurse on an acute care multi-service unit that sees every imaginable patient from infant to elderly, I spend the majority of my time preoccupied with all-things related to the cerebellum and brainstem, often at the saddening exclusion of the cerebrum (despite having psychiatric patients and every patient warranting cerebrum-related attention).  Because of this and the daily frustration I have at medical professionals bypassing the cerebrum in general (within the context of acute care), I haven’t any interest in discussing those parts of the brain in any of my blog posts.

    I mentioned that the right controls the left and vice versa, but this is not entirely the case with all functions.  As a general rule, the left hemisphere controls writing, speaking, comprehension, and even the ability to do math. The right is where artistic/musical ability is controlled, empathy and behavioral characteristics, personality and creativity.

     

    CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES: GETTING DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY

    There are four divided lobes that make up the two cerebral hemispheres, the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital (and these have further divisions I won’t get into).  All of these lobes share varying complexities in how they work together and serve to promote or sometimes inhibit the others.

    The frontal lobe mainly serves to control judgement, problem solving, intelligence, concentration, speech, body movements, and writing.  It also controls behavior, emotions, and self-awareness.  The Parietal lobe controls language interpretation, spatial and visual perception, memory, vision, hearing, and sensory functions like touch, temperature, and pain.  The occipital lobe interprets vision in regard to movement, light, and color and the temporal lobe is the part responsible for understanding language, hearing, memory, sequencing and organization.

    There is a term called Brain Lateralization whereby neural functions (cognitive processes) are more dominant on one side of the brain or the other.  I am sure you have seen images of the brain in your lifetime that show two distinct chunks (the right and left hemisphere) that look like they could be split apart without much effort.  If you’re having trouble visualizing it, here it is:

     

    330px-Cerebral_lobes
    The human brain depicting the separated hemispheres (Gutenberg Encyclopedia)

    The two hemispheres are connected by a bundle of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum. If you took away this bundle, the brain would not be able to communicate between hemispheres, something that has been done in history to treat severe epilepsy.  In these procedures, corpus callostomies were performed and very large portions of this bundle were removed entirely (these patients were called “split brain” patients).  It was in the study of these split brain patients that science was able to definitively identify what hemispheres controlled what functions for the majority of the world, and further brain mapping research has made this unarguable science at this time.

    Theory of Mind and Empathy have long been believed to stem from the frontal lobes (predominantly in the right frontal lobe) and this has been proven with repeated results throughout historical studies (http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/124/2/279).  If you research the Mirror Neuron System you will come to find that there is a general agreement amongst the scientific community that Asperger’s syndrome shows a marked impairment within these areas of the brain (predominantly within the right frontal lobe).  Men already have asymmetry in their brains (with greater use of their left hemisphere) when compared to females, so an Aspie male is genetically challenged in the areas of right-brain thinking from the very start and further compromised by their syndrome.

    brain lobes
    http://www.md-health.com/Lobes-Of-The-Brain.html

    I already mentioned the neuroscientist Dr. Frank Duffy (See: WHAT DOES AUTISM SPECTRUM MEAN?) who was able to show that the brains of an individual with Aspergers and one with Autism were very different with the use of electroencephalogram comparisons.  What I did not mention is that the children with Aspergers were shown to have much more neural connectivity in the area of their left hemisphere than the right when compared to both an Autistic and NT child.  On MRI scanning there were very distinct differences in the brain of an Autistic individual and one with Asperger’s Syndrome as well.

    The best imaging study I found in regard to a comparison between both Autism and Aspergers was published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience in 2011.  In this meta-analysis of MRI studies the distinct variations in affected parts of the brain are conclusively identified and they do NOT show that the two are the same.  While there are some lobes of the brain that show some minor overlap, they are few and far between when one looks at the differences.

    For instance:

    “Only for studies of Asperger syndrome did we note clusters of grey matter volume excess relative to controls to be primarily located in the left hemisphere, medial temporal lobe and inferior parietal lobule, with only 1 cluster of grey matter excess identified in the right hemisphere in the inferior parietal lobule.”     http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3201995/

    Again, we are seeing/hearing that the “problem” associated with Asperger’s syndrome lies within the right hemisphere of the brain, whereas the Autistic brain shows differing parts of the right and left hemisphere with only a few similarities.  What was the ultimate conclusion of this incredibly valid and peer-reviewed study?

    “An ALE meta-analysis of grey matter differences in studies of Asperger syndrome or autism supports the argument against the disorder being considered solely a milder form of autism in neuroanatomic terms. Whereas grey matter differences in people with Asperger syndrome are indeed more sparse than those reported in studies of people with autism, the distribution and direction of differences in each category is distinctive. Asperger syndrome involves clusters of lower grey matter volume in the right hemisphere and clusters of greater grey matter volume in the left hemisphere. Autism leads to more extensive bilateral excess of grey matter. Both conditions share clusters of grey matter excess in the left ventral temporal lobe components of the extrastriate visual system. This summary of a rich VBM MRI data set has important implications for how we categorize people on the autism spectrum and cautions that mixing individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome may at times obscure important characteristics manifested in one or the other condition alone.”  

     (J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2011 Nov; 36(6): 412–421)

    If the right hemisphere has a higher level of control over cognitive empathy, (and other areas shown to not be functioning “normally” in Asperger’s syndrome)… could it be that the very neural pathways required to process cognitive empathy are simply not there at all?  I highly believe this to be the case, but that is as far as the scientific data can take it at this time so my theory (See:  WHAT ABOUT EMPATHY?) will have to wait to be proven true.

    Aspergers-brain MRI

    I digress… Ok, so neuroscience appears to repeat the sentiments that the two are not the same.  Yet here we are with them grouped together and no further funding put toward the isolation and study of Aspergers in and of itself.

    According to Autism Society Org., the five major warning signs of Autism are:

    1. Does not babble or coo by 12 months
    2. Does not gesture (point, wave, grasp) by 12 months
    3. Does not say single words by 16 months
    4. Does not say two-word phrases on his or her own by 24 months
    5. Has any loss of any language or social skill at any age

    These are the medical conditions very frequently associated with Autism:

    • Gastrointestinal problems (Chronic constipation and diarrhea)
    • Low muscle tone
    • Seizures
    • Pain threshold abnormalities (Very high insensitivities or sensitivities to pain)
    • Pica (Eating of non-food objects)
    • Immune System Problems (Allergies, rashes, ear infections, chronic autoimmune problems)
    • Low IQ
    • Severe Sensitivities (Chronic reactions to taste, sound, light, textures, etc.)
    • Sleep Disturbances
    • Vision problems
    • Hearing problems

    Well, we already know the major warning signs of Autism listed above do not apply to Asperger’s syndrome since impaired language is what everyone claims sets them apart.  All of the listed medical conditions are not surprising when you look at the brain areas affected in a child or adult with Autism.  These are not common to an Asperger child or adult any more than they are to someone considered Neurotypical.  Yes, there are exceptions and some Aspies say they have similar medical problems, and there is no doubt they do.  With them though, these could be related to medications commonly prescribed to an Asperger child/adult (ADHD medications alone can cause gastrointestinal and sleep disturbances) as can the antidepressants they often receive which would certainly make their medical symptom prevalence appear similar.  They can also have zero connection at all to do with the neurological deficit causing aspergers and everything to do with genetic mutations and environmental exposure… just like every other medical condition out there for neurotypicals and aspies alike.

    Aspie men and women have normal to above normal IQ’s.  When you find an Aspie with a low IQ, it would make sense to consider High Functioning Autism over Aspergers (in my opinion).  The problem with Aspergers and why it was lumped into Autism despite all diagnostics showing a distinct difference in the parts of the brain affected, once again, is because the professionals had inconsistencies in diagnosing it.  It is not, and never has been because the two are the same.  It truly is because those entrusted to identify them as separate could not get on board with the data and research and accomplish this!  Due to the overlap in some of the symptoms in High Functioning Autism and Aspergers, everyone just threw their hands up and chose to deem them synonymous.

    At this point in time, the only shared deficits or behaviors between Asperger’s syndrome and High Functioning Autism are the focus on special interests and impaired social communication (and even those can be differentiated when analyzed closer).  Despite this fact, there is a constant claim that it is near-impossible to differentiate between the two.  Of course there is an incredible difficulty doing this right now, they opted to stop moving forward in research to break them apart, and the confusion that exists now (which was already bad) is getting worse with the DSM-5 putting them in the same diagnostic category.

    While no one can appear to agree on the cause of either disorder, it is generally accepted that Autism has a link to both genetic and nongenetic (environmental) roots.  Even Nationally recognized groups that serve to educate the public about Autism agree with this.

    “A number of nongenetic, or environmental, influence further increase a child’s risk. The clearest evidence of these environmental risk factors involves events before and during birth. They include advanced parental age at time of conception (both mom and dad), maternal illness during pregnancy, extreme prematurity and very low birth weight and certain difficulties during birth, particularly those involving periods of oxygen deprivation to the baby’s brain. Mothers exposed to high levels of pesticides and air pollution may also be at higher risk of having a child with ASD. It is important to keep in mind that these factors, by themselves, do not cause autism. Rather, in combination with genetic risk factors, they appear to modestly increase risk.”

    https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/faq

    There are no indications whatsoever that Asperger’s syndrome has anything but genetic foundations that develop when the individual’s brain is initially forming in utero.  There are no links between those appropriately diagnosed with Aspergers and any of the common environmental associations observed in Autism.

    I find it telling that the very people who have spent over 50 years working directly with and for Autistic individuals and raising awareness of Autism appear to want the two separated.  Perhaps many people miss the statements within these national and global organizations that suggest this.

    “We applaud the National Institute of Mental Health and its director Dr. Tom Insel, who has chosen not to place so much weight on the DSM-5 diagnosis categories. NIMH will not use DSM categories as the “gold standard” and will begin moving away from an exclusive focus on symptom-based categories.”

    http://www.autism-society.org/what-is/diagnosis/diagnostic-classifications/

     

     CAN THE BRAIN BE FIXED?

    When a child or adult learns how to do anything, their brain is literally creating neural pathways (messages sent along synapses) to make a permanent connection to later retrieve this information.  You are creating neural pathways as you read this silly blog post.  The more a subject is repeated, the more synapses connect, creating something that can conceivably become automatic over time.  This is exactly how cognitive-behavioral therapy works.  Individuals are taught to look at something new, or in a new light, and then repetitious reinforcement, coupled with positive associations, develop behavioral modifications that can and often do become permanent (although not unalterable).

    Neural pathways determine neurochemicals, or the strength of the information passed through synapses.  Medications temporarily change the chemistry of the “strength” of the messages sent to and from neurons, but they cannot, I repeat CANNOT change the pathways themselves.  What does this mean?  It means if a pathway does not exist in the first place, or the neurons are not present on one end or the other (or both) to even transmit or receive these messages… there is no amount of medication that can create them.  There is no way to medically help a person with Aspergers to develop cognitive empathy if the neurons and synapses associated with them are absent to begin with!

    This is why chemical intervention and treatments are a cruel promise that will never deliver to the parents of children with Aspergers or the Aspies themselves.

    There is this thing called neuroplasticity where the neural pathways in the brain are believed (and fairly well-proven) to remain changeable throughout a person’s lifetime.  Cortical remapping has been proven in response to injury whereby the damaged part of the brain develops new pathways to re-establish functions thought lost with damage sustained to the brain.  These brain changes can be in the neuron (messages) themselves (non-synaptic plasticity) or the synapses/pathways that transmit data to and from the neurons (synaptic plasticity).

    This is important to me because there appears to be a very high likelihood that the deficits observed in Aspies have caused a more pronounced use of some other parts of their brain!  

    In other words, the same amount of neurons seem to exist to that of an NT brain, but the neurons disconnected from sending messages to the areas that handle emotional reciprocity, Theory of Mind (ToM), and empathy have instead lead to more connectivity in other areas of the brain.  I also believe strongly that those with Asperger’s have affective empathy, but without the cognitive empathy to build that over time, the synapses are existent but the neurotransmitters have opted to be utilized elsewhere (giving the appearance of ZERO empathy).  Perhaps these more active neurons (in places that do not control empathy) accounts for the increased sensitivity to light, sound, textures, etc.? Perhaps this accounts for the higher level of intelligence in logical processing or extreme focus on objects?  This could be said for Autistic deficits as well, only their affected neural pathways are far vaster than that of an Aspie and likely account for the wide variation of deficits observed in more severe forms of the disability.

    New trials are underway with some proven success in neuro-therapy to utilize brain stimulation techniques that aid in the recovery and treatment of stroke and schizophrenic patients.  While I am struggling to find research on any trials of implementing this on Asperger or Autism affected individuals, it is something that certainly warrants attention.  Exciting as this sounds, it seems that there would be a higher rate of success in working with autistic individuals who appear to have more deficits in parts of the brain that could target hemispheric transference.  Since the male Asperger brain seems to be entirely lacking of synaptic connections within many right brain-dominant areas controlling empathy, there may not be a way to create synapses that simply do not exist.

    If it is true that female Aspies have more synapses connecting their neurons within the parts of the brain that function to create affective empathy maybe neural stimulation could enable them to develop even greater empathetic intelligence over time.

    If there is to be any real hope in regard to the treatment of Asperger men, it would be through the utilization of either cognitive behavioral therapy or neural stimulation.  I highly doubt there exists an opportunity to ever create true cognitive empathy in an Aspie because I do not believe those neurons exist in those specific areas of the brain (PLEASE, SOMEONE DISCOUNT THIS!!!).  I do still believe there are a billion other neurons in the Aspie brain whose synapses can be modified to enhance all of the other forms of communication that DO readily exist.  I believe that honing in on these available neural synapses can better serve the Aspie within the context of interpersonal relationships.

    GOING BACK TO THE ORIGINAL INSPIRATION BEHIND THIS POST

    In regard to the question that Hilary posed about how psychiatry is going to help with the other deficits associated with ASD; I can only say that it would first require teasing out whether or not the child or person has Autism or Aspergers in the first place.

    There is no way to specifically address the needs of any child or adult if there is no real understanding of what neurological deficits exist and require attention.  Many of the other medical issues she mentioned in her children appear to indicate that they may have Autism, albeit, the “higher functioning” form of it.  For them (if this is the case, and I am not claiming it is) the right therapists could work with “how” the medical problems affect or contribute to behavior/social ones.  It would be nice to see neuroscience find the causative link between the mind and body, but we are a long way away from that.  The answer for now would be for all disciplines of medicine to utilize interdisciplinary approaches and to work together to promote the best outcome for a person’s overall health.

    So long as there exists blurred and confused understandings of the two “disorders” (making them indistinguishable on a therapeutic level) no parent is ever going to know if they are getting their child the right help that they deserve.

    Until neuroscience can definitively prove the causation of either/both disorders, NO ONE should be boldly recommending that they be diagnosed or treated the same way!

    “HIGH FUNCTIONING” IS A TERM DEVASTATING TO ASPERGER’S SYNDROME

    It is important for me to challenge the overuse of the term “high functioning” as it relates to both Autism and Aspergers.  I do believe that there exists High Functioning Autistic individuals who do not have the same debilitating deficits seen in some children with Autism, although I also believe calling anyone with such a challenging road “high functioning” to be inappropriate as it causes incredibly unjust perceptions by the outside world.

    The term “high-functioning” is the most UNFAIR label to ever attach to anyone who has Asperger’s syndrome (and maybe parents of Autistic children will agree with this as well) because it gives the false idea that some are just less affected by their disorder than another (not true in Aspergers) and that they function “just fine” in the predominantly NT world.

    NO ONE with Asperger’s syndrome is high-functioning in this NT world, in fact, the more “high-functioning” they appear, the greater likelihood they have adapted who they are to fit in and denied or suppressed the ability to actually be themselves.  The most high functioning Aspies out there are likely suffering internally far more than those that isolate themselves and appear to be “lower-functioning” by society’s viewpoint.

    I am not meaning to personally attack anyone’s use of that word, particularly parents, as it is appropriate for what many have been told to utilize in describing a child or adult who does not have the severely debilitating deficits (like extremely low IQ or impaired/absent speech) that can be seen in what was once called Classic Autism.

    It is, however, the very use of the words “high-functioning” as it relates to an individual who should be diagnosed only as having Asperger’s syndrome that we now have a society who is becoming increasingly numb to the term autism in general.  Just click on a news story about ASD (you can find a new one each and every day on one of the major media outlets online) and you will see people constantly posting about how individuals who are just “awkward” are using the term autism as an excuse of sorts.  We are also seeing more parents who have Autistic children becoming resentful toward the Aspie children and adults deemed “high functioning” and expressing their upset over the use of the word autism when they feel their children (who are severely disabled) are now being overlooked.

    CONCLUSIONS

    My conclusions are as follows:  Asperger’s syndrome and Autism (regardless of the functional ability) are NOT the same thing.  Neurology has proven that they are not the same thing and since they clearly have not been heard, there is an incredible need to continue funding the research of both (separately).  Medicine, psychiatry, and other interdisciplinary approaches are essential in providing for the needs of individuals diagnosed with either Aspergers or Autism.

    We need to stop going backwards in science where these two “disorders” are concerned and begin moving forward and finding the biological implications within the brains of those affected.

    There may exist future therapies that can vastly improve the neural synapses that serve to define both Aspergers and Autism.

    For now, cognitive behavioral therapy is the most effective means of creating improved interpersonal relationships and needs to be explored further.

    I am so thankful for all of the responses and comments I have gotten about this blog, especially with how new it is.  I genuinely respect and appreciate everyone’s thoughts and willingness to share personal glimpses into their own experiences.

    I hope this post has cleared up why I believe that Aspergers and Autism are two distinctly different disorders and why I am an advocate for the separation and research into both of them in the future

     

    THOUGHTS?

     


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